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Walrus Man and Dr. Evazan – Who in the Galaxy is That? – by Pariah Burke

Wanted men. The originators of the severed arm running gag. The surgeon and the thug. Pirates. Spicerunners. They escaped Jedha but not Obi-Wan Kenobi.

There’s an entire galaxy of characters and adventures beyond Luke, Leia, Han, Rey, Finn, Darth Vader, Boba Fett, and the other faces that dominate the Star Wars films. Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles individual characters from the Star Wars universe—from the films, book, comics, and games. From favorite supporting characters to interesting creatures lurking in the background, if you’ve ever asked “hey, who’s that?” Who in the Galaxy is That? strives to tell you.

Walrus Man and Dr. Evazan

Backstage photo of Dr. Cornelius Evazan (left) and Ponda Baba, the Walrus Man (right). Courtesy LucasFilm/Disney.

Every Star Wars film features several running gags. “I’ve got a bad feeling about this,” for instance, is uttered in one form or another in every film, including Rogue One: A Star Wars StoryCanon. Another hallmark of Star Wars episodic films is that someone also loses a hand or arm. Both the “bad feeling” and the cleaving of limbs originates in the first Star Wars film, 1977’s Episode IV: A New HopeCanon, then merely titled Star Wars. The owner of that first dismembered arm is the Aqualish Ponda Baba, sometimes called “Sawkee.” Both names are given to him later in other media Most Star Wars fans who saw Star Wars during its initial theatrical run or owned early Star Wars action figures know Ponda Baba by his more common moniker, “Walrus Man.” It’s his arm, removed by Obi-Wan Kenobi’s lightsaber, that ignites the gruesome tradition of someone losing an arm to a lightsaber in every Star Wars episode.

Chronologically speaking, Baba’s story neither begins nor ends in that cantina. He is also rarely alone. Baba is one-half of a duo, perpetually linked with Dr. Cornelius “Roofoo” Evazan.

The cutoff arm that started all the cutoff arms. Courtesy LucasFilm/Disney.

Evazan is other man threatening Luke Skywalker that fateful day at Chalmun’s Mos Eisley Spaceport Cantina. Following the lead of his partner, Evazan tells Skywalker in Basic (effectively Star Wars English) that Baba doesn’t like him. No matter how Skywalker tries to demure to the angry pair, both Baba and Evazan continue intimidating and threatening the youth. With drunken bravado Evazan proclaims “You just want yourself. We’re wanted men. I have the death sentence on twelve systems.” A heartbeat later, refusing Obi-Wan Kenobi’s mild placation, Evazan draws his blaster. Baba follows suit, backing up his partner and returning the favor of a moment before. Before either can raise his weapon, Evazan is knocked back against the bar, a smoking line across his chest from Kenobi’s lightsaber, and Baba’s arm lying severed on the sandy floor. Not shown is what happens to the pair next.

While Kenobi and Skywalker are led by Chewbacca to a private table at the far side of the cantina, Evazan, a former doctor, attempts to reattach Baba’s limb. The procedure fails and nearly kills Baba.

Dr. Cornelius Evazan (left) and Ponda Baba the Walrus Man (middle) threaten Luke Skywalker (right). Courtesy LucasFilm/Disney.

Shortly after the cantina incident, the pirate duo of Baba and Evazan split, swearing vengeance upon one another. Their mutual recriminations put an end to a years-long criminal partnership that took them all around the galaxy, including to Jedha City on Jedha, where Evazan admonishes Cassian Ander as he would later scold Luke Skywalker—“you’d better watch yourself.”

Dr. Cornelius Evazan is a cosmetic surgeon on Abafar when he begins intentionally disfiguring his patients, rearranging limbs and scarring them horribly, for his own enjoyment. This earns the doctor a contract that bounty hunter Jodo Kast comes to collect. Kast is foiled in his attempted capture of Evazan by Baba who intends to collect the bounty on Evazan himself. Instead, Baba decides against such action and forms a partnership with Evazan instead. Together, the pair become spice runners for Tatooine crime lord Jabba Desilijic Tiure, aka Jabaa the Hutt. Formerly hansome, Evazan receives his own disfigurement during the encounter with Kast.

Dr. Cornelius “Roofoo” Evazan. Courtesy LucasFilm/Disney.

To conceal his identity, Evazan assumes the alias of “Roofoo” while Baba takes on the name “Sawkee.” Together they run spice, engage in piracy, and occasionally indulge Evazan’s surgical mutilation of other sentients. It’s this latter activity that finds them in Jedha City mere hours before the plateau city is erased by the first test-firing of the Death Star’s main weapon.

There, Evazan removes the brain and cranial housings of Jedha residents and freedom fighters severely wounded during the ongoing clash between occupying Imperial forces and insurgents. Adding cybernetics to his already unscrupulous surgery repertoire, Evazan, assisted by Baba, convert the hapless victims to living vessels for droid control modules. Dubbing them the Decraniated, the vile duo sell the creations as servants.

Ponda “Sawkee” Baba, the Walrus Man. Courtesy LucasFilm/Disney.

Both Evazan and Paba appear in every tale about the Mos Eisley cantina on the day Kenobi and Skywalker visit. From the A New Hope film itself to its novel, comic book, and radio adaptations, the read-long storybooks, and even in the whimsical Star Wars Pop-Up BookLegends (Non-Canon), though their names vary between uses, which is why each has a full name and a pseudonym, and Baba has the additional sobriquet of Walrus man.

Then known only as “Walrus Man,” Paba receives an action figure during the very first Kenner line of Star Wars action figures. His figure is prominent in all advertising surrounding the Kenner line, A New Hope, and Tatooine. It isn’t until the 1981 Star Wars Radio Drama that he is given an actual name, that of Sawkee. When he is given is official name of Pondo Baba in the 1989 Star Wars Roleplaying Game sourcebook Galaxy Guide 1: A New HopeCanon, Sawkee is retconned to be an alias Baba adopted when he began spice running. Named “Roofoo” in the 1981 radio drama, Evazan doesn’t get his full name until 2015 though his clinic, Dr. Evazan Cosmetic Surgery, appears in a 2013 episode of Star Wars: The Clone WarsCanon.

Dr. Cornelius Evazan (left) and Ponda Baba the Walrus Man (right) on Jedha. Courtesy LucasFilm/Disney.

Despite their close association, Paba the Walrus Man gets more attention beyond the events of the cantina and Jedha City. He alone made the jump to video games in the now defunct Star Wars GalaxiesLegends (Non-Canon) MMORPG, sporting a cybernetic replacement arm. Players who chose a specific character progression path were hired by CorSec (Corellian Security Force) to track down and capture Baba. Evazan was presumably off mutilating orphans at this point.

The Decraniated created by Dr. Cornelius Evazan and Ponda Baba, from the Star Wars: Rogue One: The Ultimate Visual Guide. Courtesy DK Children.

What in the Galaxy are those Symbols?

Throughout Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles you may encounter one or more of the following symbols.

Here’s what they mean:

Canon
Sources and media cited as canon contain information that is officially part of the Star Wars film universe, which also includes non-film media such as books, comic books, games, and more. This means the information is officially part of the history of Star Wars that appears in the films. It came from, or may appear within or influence, the events of a Star Wars film.
Legends
Following Return of the Jedi, George Lucas stated that he would not make other Star Wars movies. He then opened Star Wars to other creators and media. Carefully overseen by Lucas’s company, Lucas Arts, hundreds of new Star Wars novels, comic books and graphic novels, video games, and television shows were created to expand the Star Wars universe and tell stories in all directions—from thousands of years before Luke Skywalker was born to thousands of years after, from filling in the histories of the greatest Star Wars legends to bringing life to every background alien in the Cantina scene. This was the Star Wars Expanded Universe, and it was all canon until new Star Wars films were once again possible. Disney and Lucas Arts then found themselves penned in by the massive amount of material from other creators and projects. They simply couldn’t make Episode VII and beyond because every moment in the lives of the major characters of Han, Luke, Leia, and others had already been chronicled in the Expanded Universe, and very little of that could easily be translated to feature films easily followed by, and appealing to, the many different types of Star Wars fans who loved the Original Trilogy. As a result, a large portion of the formerly-canon Expanded Universe stories were declared non-canon, unofficial in terms of the film continuity. The stories still exist and continue to expand, but now in an alternate reality called Star Wars Legends while other new stories are created alongside them within the universe of the films.
Fandom-Created
Though rare, you’ll see this symbol appear from time-to-time in Who in the Galaxy is That? Star Wars fans are many and varied, and they like to create their own movies, stories, comics, artwork, and more based in the Star Wars universe. Occasionally, a fan-created work is so good and becomes so popular that it gains super star status all on its own. When such rarities relate to the characters profiled in Who in the Galaxy is That?, they are identified by the Fandom-Created symbol.

Suggest a Character to Profile

Have you ever wondered, “who in the galaxy is that?” Tell us in the comments who you’ve wondered about in the Star Wars universe of films, books, comics, games, and even toys. If you know the character’s name, tell us, but if you don’t know a name, tell us where we can find the character that has piqued your curiosity. Something like “the third bounty hunter from the left in the Star Destroyer scene in Empire Strikes Back” works quite well in directing us to who you’re thinking about. Whomever you wonder about, we might just profile in Who in the Galaxy is That?

Untold Star Wars by Graham Hancock : Luke builds his Lightsaber

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Untold Star Wars : Luke builds his Lightsaber

When Star Wars The Complete Saga was released on Blu-ray, one particular deleted scene had fans salivating. It was teased at Star Wars Celebration V, during which George Lucas revealed the scene during an announcement for the upcoming HD release. In it, Luke Skywalker finishes building his second lightsaber – the first he has constructed himself.

Having arrived on board the second Death Star and spoken with Moff Jerjerrod, Darth Vader is seen walking down a corridor, heading to his meditation chamber. It is either the same one seen in The Empire Strikes Back, or more likely the Dark Lord of the Sith has multiple chambers in various locations. From it, he calls to Luke Skywalker through the Force.

The scene wipes to Luke Skywalker, who is hearing his father’s words despite being in a completely different location. Luke is inside a cave on Tatooine, where he is completing the building of a new lightsaber. R2-D2 is with him inside the cave, and although not seen, Luke must at this point store the weapon inside the astromech droid. R2 joins C-3PO outside the cave, where the Millennium Falcon can be seen in the distance.

It is clear why fans have always been eager to see this deleted scene. There is a great childhood moment when watching Return of the Jedi, and for the first time Luke ignites his lightsaber to reveal the green blade – it is the first time a lightsaber has been coloured anything other than blue or red. It leads to so many questions – when did he build it? How?

Thankfully Han Solo spent most of his stay here enclosed in Carbonite.

This is another occasion – as Mark Hamill has joked before – of Luke Skywalker’s original introduction being cut, in favour of starting with the droids. Seeing C-3PO and R2-D2 arrive at Jabba’s Palace, with the former full of concern and trepidation, sets the audience up for just how feared the crime lord is. When Luke arrives later, casually using the Force on Jabba’s minions and strolling in confidently, it shows just how the character has progressed through the contrast with C-3PO.

Removing the scene also allows the Rebels’ plan to remain mysterious. Seeing Luke and the Millennium Falcon before the antics inside Jabba’s Palace would have made the audience aware that the entire gang was there on Tatooine and had something in place. In the film itself, each character is introduced one by one, with Luke and Leia’s involvement kept as a surprise reveal.

Luke Skywalker’s powers have grown since The Empire Strikes Back.

In terms of character beats, this scene would have established in the very opening of the movie that Darth Vader was still intending to reach out to his son. It echoes the scene at the end of The Empire Strikes Back, when Luke is on board the Millennium Falcon and his fallen father calls to him from the bridge of the Executor. It also shows that Luke is ignoring his father’s call, confirmed when he ignites the lightsaber and a green blade is emitted. Up until that happens, the audience can interpret ambiguity from Luke’s face shrouded in shadow.

There are some good reasons for this scene to have been omitted. One is the amount of repetition and exposition that it contains. Anyone who saw The Empire Strikes Back, which is a hefty percentage of the audience for Return of the Jedi, know that Darth Vader wants Luke to join him. They also know that he lost his lightsaber – the idea that anyone would be confused by Luke showing up with a new one is pretty silly.

C-3PO has a particularly on-the-nose piece of dialogue too, even by that character’s standards, when in the excised scene he says, ‘why couldn’t that bounty hunter have taken captain Solo to a more pleasant environment?’ Again, the audience knows that Han Solo was taken by bounty hunter Boba Fett and where he was being taken, then a few moments later C-3PO will mention that he and R2-D2 are heading to Jabba’s Palace. It’s all too expositional and presumes that the audience can’t remember what happened prior.

The other issue that the scene presents is giving the impression that little time has passed. If Luke Skywalker had been adventuring with the Rebel Alliance for the past year, surely he would have constructed a new lightsaber earlier than this. Darth Vader calling for Luke again also seems to be happening soon after the events of the previous film – unless he has been calling to Luke every day for the past year. By allowing Luke to show up with a new, unexplained, lightsaber and to not specify exactly where the characters have been, the audience immediately accepts that time has passed since the last movie.

Jabba should have listened to Luke in the first place.

Something else that Star Wars has always done well is leaving plenty to the audience’s imagination – the various comics and novels should leave some mystery rather than seek to fill in every little gap. Having fans wonder how Luke built his lightsaber, who devised the plan to save Han, for how long Lando Calrissian has been undercover for, all add to the idea that the audience has been thrown in to the middle of an ongoing adventure.

This scene provides a little bit of fan joy, in seeing Luke complete his lightsaber, which has even more resonance knowing how integral this is to a Jedi’s growth from the prequel era stories. It is also an undeniable treat to see any new footage of the classic trilogy cast bringing the characters to life beyond what was seen in the movies. But this scene was right to be removed, as it takes away the gradual escalation that occurs in the finished film and robs it of the mystery surrounding the plan to rescue Han Solo.

Bib Fortuna – Who in the Galaxy is That? – by Pariah Burke

Officially, within the new canon of the LucasFilms/Disney-owned Star Wars, the story of the Twi’lek Bib Fortuna ends with the destruction of Jabba’s sail barge. In Legends, his story continues… or maybe not.

There’s an entire galaxy of characters and adventures beyond Luke, Leia, Han, Rey, Finn, Darth Vader, Boba Fett, and the other faces that dominate the Star Wars films. Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles individual characters from the Star Wars universe—from the films, book, comics, and games. From favorite supporting characters to interesting creatures lurking in the background, if you’ve ever asked “hey, who’s that?” Who in the Galaxy is That? strives to tell you.

Bib Fortuna

Bib Fortuna whispers to Jabba the Hutt. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

In the continuity of the new canon, Jabba the Hutt’s majordomo Bib Fortuna appears only twice, only on film, and only doing one job.

In Episode I: The Phantom MenaceCanon Fortuna attends Jabba as the Hut crime lord of Tatooine presides over his Boonta Eve Classic pod race in observance of the Boonta Eve holiday. Fortuna is on Jabba’s balcony during the race, assisting—and waking—Jabba while Anakin Skywalker wins in a prophetic upset.

Bib Fortuna. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

Thirty-six years later, Fortuna occupies the same position as Jabba’s chamberlain and palace administrator. Fortuna witnesses Jabba’s acquisition of long-sought Han Solo, now frozen in carbonite, as well as the culmination of the plan to rescue Solo. In Episode VI: Return of the JediCanon, Fortuna accepts the Trojan horse gifts of C-3PO and R2-D2 when they arrive at Jabba’s Tatooine palace ahead of their true master. He also admits the droids’ master when he arrives, and, under the sway of a Jedi mind trick, presents Jedi Knight Luke Skywalker to Fortuna’s own vile liege. Fortuna witnesses all the events that transpire after, including Skywalker’s escape and victory at the Great Pit of Carkoon. During that decisive battle, Jabba is killed and his sail barge destroyed. Whether Fortuna dies with Jabba is the question that creates a divergence between official and unofficial accounts.

The short story “Of the Day’s Annoyances: Bib Fortuna’s Tale,” published in the anthology Tales from Jabba’s PalaceLegends (Non-Canon), describes Fortuna’s escape from the explosion of the sail barge by abandoning his master and flying back to the palace on a private skiff. Back in the palace, Fortuna battles with others intent on securing the late Hutt’s palace and possessions for themselves. Fortuna wins with the aid of the B’omarr monks with whom Fortuna had previously allied in the latest of many plots to assassinate Jabba and subsume his criminal throne. The B’omarr monks are the hideous bottled-brain spider droids roaming about Jabba’s palace, a structure that was their monastery until Jabba raided it and took it for his palace.

Luke Skywalker uses a Jedi mind trick on Bib Fortuna. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

The monks shortly betray Fortuna, forcibly extracting his brain to power a spider droid.

In the Dark Horse comic X-Wing Rogue Squadron: Battleground TatooineLegends (Non-Canon), Fortuna’s story marches on—on six legs and then again on two.

Now floating in the nutrient bath and jar dangling from the bottom of the spider droid, Fortuna continues his criminal ambitions by sending Holonet messages and enlisting the aid of Firith Olan, a fellow Twi’lek and minor crime lord on the Twi’lek home world of Ryloth. Olan travels to Tatooine and turns the tables on Fortuna, forcing the former majordomo to slice various computer systems toward the goal of installing Olan as the new head of Jabba’s criminal empire.

A B’omarr monk spider droid in Jabba’s palace. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

Olan is wounded by an Imperial officer during the execution of his plans not long after. Opportunistic Fortuna seizes the unconscious Olan and delivers him to the B’omarr monks whom he induces to perform brain transplantation once again, this time exchanging the brains of the two Twi’lek criminals. Olan’s brain replaces Fortuna’s in the spider droid while Fortuna is given to now occupy Olan’s body.

The newly re-embodied Fortuna sets his avarice gaze on the Lucky Star casino in Mos Entha. The Lucky Star is a hub for underworld activity nearly on par with Jabba’s palace in its heyday. To gain access to the Lucky Star, Fortuna pursues a relationship with Shiri’ani, the protégé of Jabba’s former chief rival, Lady Valarian, auditioning to be her majordomo.

Traditionally, any Star Wars title prefaced by “Tales” is to be considered out-of-continuity. Not only are Tales stories not Canon, they are not Expanded Universe cum Legends, either. They exist apart from the canonical reality—current or former—and present alternate realities, dreams, “what ifs”, and other flights of fancy that allow Star Wars storytellers creative indulgence without continuity obligation.

Firith Olan attacks Bib Fortuna whose brain is encased within a B’omarr spider droid. Courtesy of Dark Horse.

The anthology Tales from Jabba’s Palace, edited by Kevin J. Anderson and published in 1996, is one such non-Canon, non-Legends book—except at least two of its short stories are Legends and formerly Canon via Expanded Universe. With the continuation of “Of the Day’s Annoyances: Bib Fortuna’s Tale” in the pages of an Expanded Universe comic book, the story becomes official—as does much of the detail of Fortuna’s life and fate told through the other short stories in Tales from Jabba’s Palace. Another tale, “Sleight of Hand: The Tale of Mara Jade,” recounts Mara Jade, the Emperor’s Hand, infiltrating Jabba’s palace while on a mission. That story becomes a canonical part of Jade’s biography. These discrepancy puts Tales from Jabba’s Palace in a confounding place of being categorized as Tales but containing at least some official Star Wars history. There has been no official comment as to whether “Sleight of Hand” is the only canonical account and, if not, which of the other 18 narratives—most featuring Fortuna—are true. Nor can fans feel confident believing or discounting the most intriguing short story in the anthology, the one that details Boba Fett’s escape from the Sarlaac.

The ambiguity of Tales from Jabba’s Palace and its place in Star Wars Legends continuity makes Fortuna’s fate unknown. On screen, his demise is never shown, only assumed. It’s possible he survives and continues to operate as someone’s second-in-command in the Tatooine underworld to this day.

By virtue of his close orbit to infamous Outer Rim crime lord Jabba Desilijic Tiure, better known as Jabba the Hutt, Bib Fortuna’s name is forever linked with his former master’s. Fortuna appears in mention in dozens of novels, comics, and short stories, and seen almost without fail in every instance, in all media, in which Jabba himself is depicted. Fortuna has become a Star Wars stereotype for weak-willed, vile underlings, and his photo would be beside the definition for “slimeball” in a Star Wars dictionary.

Bib Fortuna beside his master, Jabba the Hutt. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

What in the Galaxy are those Symbols?

Throughout Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles you may encounter one or more of the following symbols.

Here’s what they mean:

Canon
Sources and media cited as canon contain information that is officially part of the Star Wars film universe, which also includes non-film media such as books, comic books, games, and more. This means the information is officially part of the history of Star Wars that appears in the films. It came from, or may appear within or influence, the events of a Star Wars film.
Legends
Following Return of the Jedi, George Lucas stated that he would not make other Star Wars movies. He then opened Star Wars to other creators and media. Carefully overseen by Lucas’s company, Lucas Arts, hundreds of new Star Wars novels, comic books and graphic novels, video games, and television shows were created to expand the Star Wars universe and tell stories in all directions—from thousands of years before Luke Skywalker was born to thousands of years after, from filling in the histories of the greatest Star Wars legends to bringing life to every background alien in the Cantina scene. This was the Star Wars Expanded Universe, and it was all canon until new Star Wars films were once again possible. Disney and Lucas Arts then found themselves penned in by the massive amount of material from other creators and projects. They simply couldn’t make Episode VII and beyond because every moment in the lives of the major characters of Han, Luke, Leia, and others had already been chronicled in the Expanded Universe, and very little of that could easily be translated to feature films easily followed by, and appealing to, the many different types of Star Wars fans who loved the Original Trilogy. As a result, a large portion of the formerly-canon Expanded Universe stories were declared non-canon, unofficial in terms of the film continuity. The stories still exist and continue to expand, but now in an alternate reality called Star Wars Legends while other new stories are created alongside them within the universe of the films.
Fandom-Created
Though rare, you’ll see this symbol appear from time-to-time in Who in the Galaxy is That? Star Wars fans are many and varied, and they like to create their own movies, stories, comics, artwork, and more based in the Star Wars universe. Occasionally, a fan-created work is so good and becomes so popular that it gains super star status all on its own. When such rarities relate to the characters profiled in Who in the Galaxy is That?, they are identified by the Fandom-Created symbol.

Suggest a Character to Profile

Have you ever wondered, “who in the galaxy is that?” Tell us in the comments who you’ve wondered about in the Star Wars universe of films, books, comics, games, and even toys. If you know the character’s name, tell us, but if you don’t know a name, tell us where we can find the character that has piqued your curiosity. Something like “the third bounty hunter from the left in the Star Destroyer scene in Empire Strikes Back” works quite well in directing us to who you’re thinking about. Whomever you wonder about, we might just profile in Who in the Galaxy is That?

Untold Star Wars by Graham Hancock : Boonta Eve Podrace

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Untold Star Wars: Boonta Eve Podrace

One of the most exhilarating sequences in Star Wars The Phantom Menace is the thrill ride that is the Boonta Eve Podrace. Taking full advantage of the special effects breakthroughs that ILM had made, the movie offered something unlike anything else that had been seen before on screen, with podracers hurtling along at incomprehensible speeds. With a variety of alien species represented both as pilots and in the crowd, a huge amount of work went into designing creatures and cultures that reside on the lawless world of Tatooine.

George Lucas showed his penchant for exploring Tatooine culture when working on the Star Wars Special Editions, as he added the extended arrival to Mos Eisley Spaceport, featuring new designs such as the Ronto. But the 1999 released theatrical cut of The Phantom Menace did not have the extended introduction to the podrace that was re-introduced for the DVD release. An even longer version is included as part of the selection of deleted scenes included in the bonus features.

The pre-race theatre is an important of the Boonta Eve Classic.

In the extended version of the scene, almost all of the podracer pilots get an introduction. Characters who are barely seen in the original cut before getting blown to pieces or derailed during the race get a fraction more screen time. One of the snippets actually reincorporated is Ody Mandrell’s introduction, alongside his Pit Droid team that offers a nod to the three stooges.

Elsewhere in the sequence, Jar Jar Binks accidentally upstages Mars Guo, giving the Gungan another faux pas to add to his running total. Ratts Tyerell gets a memorable introduction thanks to a cut-away shot to his family, made up of even smaller blue aliens. It seems clear why certain designs were initially discarded or only got reduced screen time, as characters such as Ark ‘Bumpy’ Roose are ugly even by the standard of Star Wars aliens. Introducing the various podrace pilots makes a lot of sense, but leaving the less appealing designs on the cutting room floor and focusing on a selection of characters means the race gets an opening without being too indulgent.

Anakin displays his resourcefulness further in the deleted scenes.

As the race is about to begin, there are numerous shots of the various podrace pilots revving their engines and preparing. These include cuts to the crowds and Jabba the Hutt as well as going between the pilots. It’s understandable that this footage wasn’t reincorporated for the DVD as it adds very little and the podrace can only make up a certain proportion of the film’s running time.

In the original cut of The Phantom Menace, the podrace was slightly confusing. The first lap is shown in almost its entirety, but the two following laps are so much shorter that it is hard to follow exactly what the geography of the race is and how far through the race the characters are. That is partly due to the second lap being left almost entirely on the cutting room floor – although some argue that the podrace was plenty long enough already, Lucas took the opportunity to put a lot of the second lap back into the film when it was released on DVD.

The deleted scenes show Sebulba cheating in even more ways.

For the full deleted second lap, fans must go to the bonus features on the same DVD release. In that full version of the scene, Sebulba’s skulduggery continues as he flames Clegg Holdfast and throws a detonator into Toy Dampner’s engine. On the flip side, the scene underscores Anakin Skywalker’s resourcefulness further, showing him out-think Gasgano and Teemto Pagalies, who both attempt to prevent him from overtaking them.

One of the lovely little touches that screams Star Wars is seeing the Scavenger Droids in the deleted scene version. They are deployed after a podrace crash, and collect the wrecked debris, presumably in order to reuse it. The design of the droids fits the Tatooine aesthetic perfectly and is an example of the great designs that provide the window dressing in a Star Wars shot. The droids do make the mistake of getting in the way of Anakin’s podracer, though.

Jabba the Hutt oversees the proceedings.

The Tusken Raiders taking pot shots at the podracers zooming past is included in the film, but the deleted scene also shows them shooting at Jawas who have rushed to attempt to salvage a just-wrecked podracer. It’s a slightly hokey few shots that doesn’t match the pace of the rest of the sequence.

Putting much of the second lap back into the film for the DVD release means that the race makes more sense, with the route clearer and the timing more logical than it seemed originally. It seems that the filmmakers were concerned about extending the sequence by too much, as the full version of the deleted second lap is even longer. Of course none of the information provided in either is particularly necessary, but it all adds to the immersive nature of the event and environment.

Greedo should have heeded Wald’s advice.

An interesting scene that was intended to follow the podrace sees Anakin scuffling with a young Rodian about the same size as him. Qui-Gon intervenes to stop the pair from fighting, which it turns out started because the Rodian accused Anakin of cheating. It transpires that the young alien is none other than Greedo – his fellow Rodian, Wald, warns him that if he isn’t careful, he’ll come to a bad end. Although Lucas is fond of linking up characters throughout the saga, this perhaps seemed a coincidence too far and was wisely cut from the film.

This theatrical version of The Phantom Menace probably had a podrace duration that was felt appropriate for cinema audiences, but the mis-matched length of the circuits made it a little confusing. The DVD release added more high octane fun without letting the sequence outstay its welcome. What the deleted scenes tell viewers is a little more about Tatooine and podrace culture – it’s a classic example of when in a Star Wars film the camera pans that little bit left and finds a little something that gives a bit of extra colour to the world. It’s why Star Wars is immersive and rich in a way that few cinematic spectacles achieve. Why these scenes were omitted makes perfect sense, but for anyone who enjoys the Star Wars galaxy, they are very worthwhile viewing.

Per Hedman’s – Life According to Darth – Darth on Travel

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Darth on Travel

Affordable Travel
Affordable Travel

 

 

Who Likes None Space Flig
Who Likes None Space Flights

 

 

Getting Towed by a Cruiser is No Way To Travel
Getting Towed is No Way To Travel

 

 

First Darth On The Moon
First Darth On The Moon

 

 

Did or Didn't
Did or Didn’t

 

 

Next week……

R5-D4 aka “Red” – Who in the Galaxy is That? – by Pariah Burke

But for one droid’s bad motivator, Luke Skywalker might never have joined the Galactic Civil War and the Death Star could still be menacing the galaxy. Who broke R5-D4’s motivator? Did he sacrifice himself? Did R2-D2 sabotage him? Was the droid actually a Jedi? Is there a conspiracy to hide the truth? We reveal all!

There’s an entire galaxy of characters and adventures beyond Luke, Leia, Han, Rey, Finn, Darth Vader, Boba Fett, and the other faces that dominate the Star Wars films. Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles individual characters from the Star Wars universe—from the films, book, comics, and games. From favorite supporting characters to interesting creatures lurking in the background, if you’ve ever asked “hey, who’s that?” Who in the Galaxy is That? strives to tell you.

R5-D4 aka “Red”

R5-D4 apparently blows out his motivator in Episode IV: A New Hope. Malfunction, sabotage, or self-sacrifice? Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

Had the Lars-Skywalker family not purchased R2-D2, he, and the urgent message for the aging Obi-Wan Kenobi, would have been left in the custody of the Jawas, enslaved by restraining bolt, until hopefully purchased at some later date by someone else. “Old Ben” Kenobi might have died a hermit in the Dune Sea. From there, who knows what would have happened to the Rebellion, attacked at Yavin IV by a Death Star whose weakness they didn’t know. What might have happened to the galaxy if the Battle of Yavin was merely a footnote in the Imperial Archives rather than a decisive battle of such significance that all Star Wars events cite it as the zero-hour for a timeline spanning thousands of years forward and back?

Were these questions R2-D2 posed to himself when deciding to take the extreme measure of sabotaging R5-D4 to ensure it was he, not “Red”, who ended up with Luke Skywalker?

R5-D4 leaves R2-D2 behind for the moment. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

On film, Episode IV: A New HopeCanon, R5-D4’s bad motivator and his subsequent replacement with consolation prize R2 looks like bad luck or poor droid maintenance on the part of the Jawas. The official radio drama of A New Hope presents a longer narrative with a more nefarious cause to the troubles experienced by the R5-series droid Skywalker nicknames “Red.” In true Han-shot-first spiritual kinship, R2-D2 actually sabotages the other astromech droid to ensure his own purchase, according to the unabridged Star Wars: The Original Radio Drama.Canon R2, knowing the importance of his mission from Prince Leia, and that his best chance to find Obi-Wan Kenobi lies in being bought and escaping at his earliest opportunity, actually sacrifices another droid.

Is this true or merely Fox News-style embellishment? We may never know for sure. The films are the ultimate canon, but radio dramas from the films have long been held as canon, too. Several examples exist of the Lucasfilm-authorized radio dramas including in-canon details left off celluloid. Is R2’s sabotage of R5 one of those? Both Disney and Lucas before it have been silent on the matter, leading some to conclude that R2’s guilt is being covered up at the highest level—George Lucas himself. After all, sources argue, Lucas has fumbled through decades of attempted misdirections and obfuscations of Han Solo’s pre-emptive blasting of Greedo.

R2-D2 worries as Lars Owen and Luke Skywalker decide to buy R5-D4 “Red” instead of him… Or could R2’s expression be satisfaction, knowing that his sabotage of R5 will soon come to fruition? Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

Others equate the R2 sabotage story with even more incredulous tales told about R5-D4.

In one, Red actually damaged himself to thwart his purchase so that R2 could succeed in his critical mission. Red, it was said, was a Rebel sympathizer willing to sacrifice himself for the greater good. With Red presenting as if he had a bad motivator, Lars’s only other choice for an astromech purchase was R2.

The most outlandish story yet was told in the far-from-canon Star Wars Tales issue number 1. In the Peter David-written story inside, R5-D4 is the titular “Skippy the Jedi Droid.” R5-D4—Skippy—is a Force-wielding droid serving drinks in the palace of Jabba the Hutt when, one day, he uses Jedi mind-control techniques to influence a Gamorrean guard into allowing him to runaway. Skippy escapes the palace to be salvaged by the nomadic Jawas. While in their transport, Skippy receives a vision from the Force, a vision that reveals to him Darth Vader’s evil, the plight of Princess Leia and the galaxy, and the role to be played in the coming salvation of the latter from the former by R2-D2 and C-3PO, both of whom have just been picked up by the same Jawa sandcrawler.

Presented for sale to Owen Lars and his nephew, Skippy instantly recognizes the Force potential in Skywalker. He again uses his Force powers to ensure his purchase, only to subvert the sale only a moment later. Though overjoyed at the prospect of being partnered with a powerful Force-sensitive with whom he could commune, Skippy quickly understands the horrible fate that awaits R2-D2, Leia, and the galaxy as a whole should he allow himself and not R2 to become Skywalker’s droid. Poignantly, Skippy sacrifices his joy, and indeed himself, for the greater good. He attacks himself with the Force, driving it “inward like a spike,” setting off a minor explosion within himself and simulating a motivator malfunction. He then nudges C-3PO to suggest R2 as Skippy’s replacement. For Skippy, the act is the ultimate sacrifice: he is soon destroyed in the Stormtrooper raid on the sandcrawler.

R5-D4 is really Skippy the Jedi Droid. Courtesy of Dark Horse Comics.

While you may be tempted to dismiss this story out of hand, there is one final twist to reveal, dear reader. This adventure is recounted in the panels and pages of Star Wars Tales, a comic book series filled with stories that could only have come from the sort of delusions that result from drinking spoiled blue milk and, as I already told you, was so far out of canon it wasn’t even Expanded Universe. Yet within Star Wars Tales isn’t the only mention of Skippy the Jedi Droid.

That particular legend became Legends indeed and formerly canon in the in-continuity essay “Droids, Technology and the Force: A Clash of Phenomena” written by Jedi Knight Tam Azur-Jamin. The essay was incorporated into an article published on Hyperspace, the now-defunct, then-official Star Wars Fan Club website that produced other in-canon content. More importantly, the status of “Droids, Technology and the Force: A Clash of Phenomena” and its content of being canon was cemented by its inclusion in the 2008 The Complete Star Wars EncyclopediaLegends (Non-Canon), which has only since been decreed Legends and not Canon to make way for future stories in the Disney-owned Star Was universe.

R5-D4 publicity photo. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

In the essay, Azur-Jamin discusses several examples of technology interacting, and indeed merging, with the Force; mentioned in passing but unequivocally is Skippy the Jedi Droid. Ergo, the existence of Skippy, be he R5-D4 or another droid from another time or place, is Star Wars fact.

Which story is fact? Which are fiction? Was R5-D4 just broken down, or did R2-D2 help him break down? Or, was R5 really Skippy the Jedi Droid, sacrificing himself for the fate of the galaxy? You decide!

R5-D4 appears on film only in A New Hope though he does also appear on the 1980 Christmas in the Stars: Star Wars Christmas AlbumLegends (Non-Canon) where he is kissed by Chewbacca beneath the mistletoe. Other R5-series droids appear in the background of most Star Wars films and television shows, including R5-D8, the astromech belonging to X-Wing pilot Jek Tono Porkins, who fights in the Battle of Yavin. R2-AG units, which are R2 astromechs in R5 bodies, are also found throughout the Star Wars universe.

Despite his short screen time, R5-D4’s bad motivator earns the droid an action figure in every line of Star Wars action figures since the original. It also made R5-series droids popular in the now closed massively multi-player online roleplaying game, Star Wars GalaxiesLegends (Non-Canon), in which players could build, sell, and buy R2, R3, R4, and R5 droids with customizable color schemes. The most popular, of course, was R5-D4’s signature red decals on a white body.

R5-D4 aboard the Jawa sandcrawler. Waiting patiently? Already the victim of sabotage? Or having a Force vision? You decide. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

What in the Galaxy are those Symbols?

Throughout Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles you may encounter one or more of the following symbols.

Here’s what they mean:

Canon
Sources and media cited as canon contain information that is officially part of the Star Wars film universe, which also includes non-film media such as books, comic books, games, and more. This means the information is officially part of the history of Star Wars that appears in the films. It came from, or may appear within or influence, the events of a Star Wars film.
Legends
Following Return of the Jedi, George Lucas stated that he would not make other Star Wars movies. He then opened Star Wars to other creators and media. Carefully overseen by Lucas’s company, Lucas Arts, hundreds of new Star Wars novels, comic books and graphic novels, video games, and television shows were created to expand the Star Wars universe and tell stories in all directions—from thousands of years before Luke Skywalker was born to thousands of years after, from filling in the histories of the greatest Star Wars legends to bringing life to every background alien in the Cantina scene. This was the Star Wars Expanded Universe, and it was all canon until new Star Wars films were once again possible. Disney and Lucas Arts then found themselves penned in by the massive amount of material from other creators and projects. They simply couldn’t make Episode VII and beyond because every moment in the lives of the major characters of Han, Luke, Leia, and others had already been chronicled in the Expanded Universe, and very little of that could easily be translated to feature films easily followed by, and appealing to, the many different types of Star Wars fans who loved the Original Trilogy. As a result, a large portion of the formerly-canon Expanded Universe stories were declared non-canon, unofficial in terms of the film continuity. The stories still exist and continue to expand, but now in an alternate reality called Star Wars Legends while other new stories are created alongside them within the universe of the films.
Fandom-Created
Though rare, you’ll see this symbol appear from time-to-time in Who in the Galaxy is That? Star Wars fans are many and varied, and they like to create their own movies, stories, comics, artwork, and more based in the Star Wars universe. Occasionally, a fan-created work is so good and becomes so popular that it gains super star status all on its own. When such rarities relate to the characters profiled in Who in the Galaxy is That?, they are identified by the Fandom-Created symbol.

Suggest a Character to Profile

Have you ever wondered, “who in the galaxy is that?” Tell us in the comments who you’ve wondered about in the Star Wars universe of films, books, comics, games, and even toys. If you know the character’s name, tell us, but if you don’t know a name, tell us where we can find the character that has piqued your curiosity. Something like “the third bounty hunter from the left in the Star Destroyer scene in Empire Strikes Back” works quite well in directing us to who you’re thinking about. Whomever you wonder about, we might just profile in Who in the Galaxy is That?

Untold Star Wars by Graham Hancock : Rescuing Darth Sidious

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Untold Star Wars: Rescuing Darth Sidious

The Star Wars prequel trilogy, and Revenge of the Sith in particular, is packed full of dramatic irony. One of the best examples of this is the opening to Episode III, which opens in the middle of a dramatic aerial battle above Coruscant, as Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker are going to rescue Chancellor Palpatine. Seeing the two Jedi going to such heroic lengths to rescue the villain who has orchestrated the events of the entire story makes for a great sense of foreboding. It tells the audience straight away that Sith is about to get real.

As a piece of filmmaking, it is George Lucas at his fastest and most intense. None of the exposition that opened The Phantom Menace or Attack of the Clones was deemed necessary here – it’s the third part of a trilogy, the audience knows the characters, so Lucas opts to kick things off with high-octane adventure. Perhaps all of the gloom that would come later in the movie emboldened the writer/producer/director to open with such a pure, exhilarating sequence.

Revenge of the Sith has the fastest-paced opening of any Star Wars movie.

It’s a relatively long section of the film incorporating the opening space battle, the rescue of the Chancellor, capture by General Grievous and return to Coruscant. Considering the amount that Revenge of the Sith had to do, in terms of showing how Palpatine enacted the final stages of his plot and the galaxy came to be as it is in A New Hope, it is particularly surprising that this adventure lasts so long. But the deleted scenes show that this could have been even longer. To see them, check out the Revenge of the Sith DVD and Complete Sage Blu-ray.

What is great fun – and also full of impending doom – during the sequence is seeing the bond of friendship between Obi-Wan and Anakin. The back and forth between them demonstrates quickly just how they have grown as equals, and how a daring rescue mission is just another day in the life of a Jedi Knight. The casual way in which Anakin’s love for his friends is re-established, as he refuses to leave Obi-Wan behind twice, is a great way to call back to his attachment issues in Attack of the Clones that will become all the more prevalent later in Revenge of the Sith.

Obi-Wan and Anakin make finding Palpatine look easy.

The first deleted scene from this sequence takes place on General Grievous’ flagship, the Invisible Hand, and sees Obi-Wan and Anakin debating droid speak while waiting for an elevator. Although it continues to show their relaxed relationship, the humour is a little less natural than elsewhere in the opening. Whether the finished film would have had actual droid dialogue coming from Hayden Christiansen’s lips, or if he would have been imitating it, is unknown – but either way it seems a little surreal for Star Wars.

Another gag as part of the snippets deleted from the elevator scenes sees Obi-Wan and Anakin accidentally open the doors on a huge number of Battle Droids, a nice nod to the scene in A New Hope in which Han Solo accidentally runs into a room on the Death Star absolutely packed with Imperial troops. Like the Harrison Ford swordsmen gag in Temple of the Doom, had it been included it would have meant the call back gag occurring chronologically before the original – it’s classic Lucas timeline fun.

General Grievous showed his callousness in the film’s deleted scenes.

The more significant deleted scene is when Shaak Ti is executed by General Grievous, showing his brutality on-screen rather than just representing it through the dialogue as part of the bridge scene. The reason for executing her in front of the two Jedi is not entirely clear, and audiences may have been confused as to why Shaak Ti was on board the Invisible Hand ahead of Obi-Wan and Anakin. In the Clone Wars animated micro-series that aired ahead of the film release, Shaak Ti was shown to have been captured by Grievous during the siege of Coruscant, hence her being located board his flagship. The scene was adding more moving parts than necessary to the opening sequence, and making its removal understandable.

It would have introduced the character of General Grievous before the Jedi rescue Chancellor Palpatine, changing the order of events in the film. With so many villains for casual moviegoers to keep track of, it made sense to dispatch Count Dooku before bringing General Grievous into the proceedings.

Originally, General Grievous was introduced before the Jedi rescued Palpatine.

One Shaak Ti has been executed, droids surround Obi-Wan and Anakin, who use a series of gestures to discuss in code what might be their best tactic. It’s amusing enough, but seems slightly off in a Star Wars movie – although it does reiterate the closeness of the relationship between the two of them. They ultimately opt to drop through the floor, which gives Obi-Wan a chance to use the word ‘oblivion’, a reference to his first meeting with Jar Jar Binks in The Phantom Menace he warns the Gungan of the Trade Federation threat.

Further scenes were shot, but not completed, that showed Obi-Wan and Anakin escaping with Chancellor Palpatine and the support of R2-D2. These were more jeopardy moments, on a blue screen set with small sections of the flagship interior for them to move across. It must have been rather exerting for Ian McDiarmid, who in his portrayal of Palpatine had typically not had many action sequences – of course thanks to stunt doubles and CGI he would have had help. Ultimately, these snippets only added to the duration of the opening rather than giving any meaningful character or plot information.

Escaping from the Invisible Hand was even more dramatic in early cuts of the film.

Ultimately, many fans would happily have watched a version of Revenge of the Sith twice as long as the finished film. With so much to wrap up in the prequel saga, George Lucas jettisoned anything that was deemed not to be telling the story in the leanest, most efficient way. The portion of the film that was probably the easiest to cut down was this opening, which remains an exhilarating thrill ride presented in a way that only a Star Wars movie can.

Star Wars This Week – 7 April 2017

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April 7 2017

The week’s newest Star Wars-related news and most entertaining content–curated by a Star Wars fan, for the Star Wars fan…

What Made Darth Vader So Loyal to the Emperor – Star Wars Explained – YouTube

"We explain why Darth Vader was so loyal to his master Palpatine or the emperor of the galactic empire. We explore his physiological chains as well as physical chains and master plan and manipulation that resulted in Vader being so loyal to a master he originally intended on overthrowing. We explain the reasoning from Sith doctrine to the flaws of Anakin Skywalker himself. "

Imperial Code Cylinders – What They Are and What They Do – YouTube

"The Non-Canon Expert describes what Imperial Code Cylinders are and why they were adopted by the Galactic Empire. "

What Kylo Ren’s New Look Means for Star Wars The Last Jedi! (Nerdist News w/ Jessica Chobot) – YouTube

"Kylo Ren has a new look for Star Wars The Last Jedi, but what does it tell us about the plot of the movie? Jessica has the reveal (with SPOILERS) on today’s Nerdist News! "

6 Star Wars Actors Who Hated Their Roles! – YouTube

"You’d think most actors would jump at the opportunity to feature in the galaxy far, far away, what with the franchise’s uncanny ability to make stars at the drop of a hat. However, sometimes a dream come true can often turn into an unbearable nightmare, as proven by these 6 Star Wars actors who hated their roles! "

If The Republic Used Droids: Star Wars Rethink – YouTube

"The clone army battled the fierce droids using superior tactics but what would of happend if both the republic and CIS had droid armies? "

Rogue One’s Star Wars Story Sprang from A Dropped TV Series Pitch – CBR

"Industrial Light & Magic’s visual effects supervisor John Knoll has been telling stories in the “Star Wars” universe for many years, though typically in segments and pieces, providing some of the prequel saga’s most lavish and eye-popping FX. But the tale of “Rogue One” was, from the outset, entirely his brainchild. "

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story: The Battle of Scarif’s biggest moment was barely scripted | SyfyWire

"And almost none of that was directly in the script, EP and VFX Supervisor John Knoll told Syfy Wire during a visit to Industrial Light and Magic in San Francisco. "

The REAL SIZE of STAR WARS SHIPS Explained – YouTube

"One of the coolest things about star wars is just how many call star ships there are. But do we actually know how big the largest ones are? Well we’re going to take a look at the biggest of the biggest star ships starting with the millennium falcon, to the imperial class star destroyer all the way to the death star and we’ll compare to things in our real physical world. "

Why Did Darth Vader Die in Return of the Jedi? – Star Wars Explained – YouTube

"In Star Wars Return of the Jedi, why did Darth Vader die? Was it at the hands of Luke Skywalker? Emperor Palpatine? Or did he lose the will to live like Padme? "

Update! The Potential Name of the Dubrovnik Location from The Last Jedi Revealed? | Star Wars News Net

"The guys from Making Star Wars may have very well figured out the name of the planet represented by the real-world city of Dubrovnik in The Last Jedi. Since we’re not sure if the name is intended to be a surprise and if you’re trying to stay away from spoilers, stop reading now. "

7 Things You Didn’t Know About Star Wars: The Visual Encyclopedia | StarWars.com

"AUTHORS TRICIA BARR, ADAM BRAY, AND COLE HORTON DISCUSS THE MAKING OF THEIR EXHAUSTIVE NEW GUIDE. "

Star Wars: 15 Stories REBELS Needs To Tell In Season 4 – CBR

"Despite all of this solid storytelling though, there still remains a surprisingly large number of unresolved plotlines to be covered and a variety of characters that need to make an appearance on the show before its timeline inevitably reaches “Rogue One” and “A New Hope.” Here’s everything that needs to happen in “Star Wars: Rebels” Season Four. "

Why Most Jedi Didn’t Sense Order 66 – Star Wars Explained – YouTube

"Why couldn’t more Jedi sense Order 66 in Revenge of the Sith? In Revenge of the Sith we see Yoda is able to sense the death of his Jedi brothers and sisters and react to the betrayal of Palpatine and the clone troopers but why didn’t more Jedi including Obi-Wan sense the death of so many Jedi by the clones they fought beside? In this video we answer that very question. "

Was C3PO SPYING for DARTH VADER? Star Wars Theory – YouTube

"C3PO played a huge part in Anakin Skywalker’s childhood and development. But when Anakin turned into Darth Vader did he continue to keep his connection to his beloved protocol droid. We analyze all the major star wars movies as well as some legends to see if Darth Vader was actually spying on the rebellion using C3PO. "

Timothy Zahn on His Novel Thrawn, How to Pronounce the Grand Admiral’s Full Name, and More | StarWars.com

"THE CREATOR OF THE FAN-FAVORITE IMPERIAL STRATEGIST SPEAKS. "

Actors Who Refused Huge Star Wars Roles – YouTube

"It may be hard to believe, but there have been quite a few actors who’ve turned down the chance to appear in Star Wars. It’s only the biggest movie franchise in human history, so what’s the big deal? Here are a few actors who, for whatever reason, refused to appear in Star Wars at one time or another… "

Top 7 Most Potentially Powerful Jedi and Sith in Star Wars – YouTube

"In this video we count down the top 7 most potentially powerful characters in the Star Wars universe. Potential meaning the most “naturally” powerful Star Wars characters not the actual power that was achieved by the character. In this video we explore the potential of characters like Starkiller Luke/Anakin Skywalker and many more. "

Mark Hamill is Han Solo in Star Wars: The Force Awakens Bad Lip Reading – CBR

"In the video, Hamill lends his voice to Han Solo in a killer impression. Though Han Solo gets much of the attention, characters like Rey, Finn and General Leia all get the spotlight as well. Hilariously, the video also gives voice to characters like Chewbacca and BB-8, who becomes a gruff droid named Ricky now that he can “speak.” "

The Retelling of ‘Star Wars’ in This Decades Old Chinese Comic Book is Simply Stunning! | Star Wars News Net

"Back in the 1980’s, a few Chinese publishers released comic book adaptations of George Lucas’ blockbuster smash hit film Star Wars. One Chinese retelling was packed with illustrations showing scenes from the famous 1977 blockbuster film. However, beyond Darth Vader, C-3PO, R2 and a few other characters, the book was vastly different from the movie’s storyline. This is by far one of the most interesting movie adaptations ever created. You’ve got to see this!"

Mission Orange: Carrie Fisher Memorial Patch – Jedi News – Your Daily Star Wars News Resource

"Our good friend and tireless charity fundraiser Magnus brings us his latest Mission Orange patch, a beautiful piece remembering the late Carrie Fisher. "

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story With Riz Ahmed aka Bodhi Rook | Untold | Disney – YouTube

"Sit down with Riz Ahmed and hear his untold stories from playing pilot Bodhi Rook in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. "

Alistair Petrie (General Draven) – Star Wars Interviews

"What did they tell you about your character and how to portray him? Did they give you any background information for instance?"

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story "Becoming Bodhi" – YouTube

"In this behind-the-scenes clip from Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, director Gareth Edwards reveals some of Riz Ahmed’s numerous auditions for the role of Bodhi Rook. "

The Official Site Looks Into The Design Of The U-wing – Jedi News – Your Daily Star Wars News Resource

"The official Star Wars Twitter feed takes a look at the instantly iconic U-wing, a vehicle so deftly designed in the OT style, if it turned up in a Return of the Jedi special special special edition no one would bat an eyelid. "

John Knoll Interview: How Many VFX Shots Are in Rogue One?

"Right now, we have an interview with Knoll where he told us how many visual effects shots were in Rogue One (including comparing the number to the rest of the Star Wars library), why recreating concept artist Ralph McQuarrie‘s designs for the Death Star with visual effects was so difficult, and much more about the visual effects of the movie. "

10 Things We Learned from Rogue One: The Ultimate Visual Guide | StarWars.com

"AS ROGUE ONE FINALLY ARRIVES HOME, HERE’S NEW INTEL THAT WILL TAKE YOU DEEPER INTO THE FILM."

Fantasy Flight Games: Enter Jabba’s Palace – Jedi News – Your Daily Star Wars News Resource

"Fantasy Flight Games reveal the skirmish map for Jabba’s Palace, the latest release for Star Wars: Imperial Assault."

Rogue One’s First Writer Got the Job in a Very Simple Way

"It was a day long remembered: October 30, 2012. The day Disney announced it had bought Lucasfilm and would be releasing new Star Wars movies. Fans everywhere immediately began freaking out about the news, but one in particular saw it as an opportunity."

Designing an Empire: Doug Chiang on Imperial Architecture in Rogue One | StarWars.com

"THE ROGUE ONE CO-PRODUCTION DESIGNER DISCUSSES CONCEPT ART THE EMPEROR WOULD LOVE."

Operation: Blue Milk Revealed: Star Wars: From a Certain Point of View Anthology Book Celebrates 40 Years of A Galaxy Far, Far Away | StarWars.com

"In celebration of Star Wars’ 40th anniversary, Del Rey is going to shine the spotlight on those unsung weirdos, heroes, and villains with a unique, new anthology. Star Wars: From a Certain Point of View, coming October 2017, will bring together more than 40 authors for 40 stories. Each will be told from the perspective of background characters of A New Hope — from X-wing pilots who helped Luke destroy the Death Star to the stormtroopers who never quite could find the droids they were looking for. There’s never been a Star Wars book like it, and you can get a first look at the cover below!"

Mark Hamill and Carrie Fisher to be Honored as Disney Legends | The Star Wars Underworld

"Two stars of the Star Wars films will be receiving Disney’s highest honor.  Luke Skywalker actor Mark Hamill and Princess Leia actress the late Carrie Fisher will be honored as Disney Legends in a ceremony at the D23 Expo in Anaheim, California this July.  Other new Disney Legends being honored include Oprah Winfrey and Stan Lee.  "

Alan Tudyk Thought the Director of Rogue One Just Wanted to Talk to Him About I, Robot

K-2SO is not the first robot Alan Tudyk has played. He also portrayed one in the 2004 Will Smith film I, Robot—and he initially thought that’s what Rogue One director Gareth Edwards wanted to talk to him about the first time they spoke.

Here Are All the Canceled Star Wars Video Games

The list of canceled Star Wars video games is a lot longer than just the lamented Battlefront 3, which was absurdly sunk by LucasArts and never materialized.

Star Wars: A Massive Rogue One Scene Was Secret Kept From The Cast

“They kept that from us!” Ahmed explained. “That was never in the script. We didn’t know about it! It was the first time we saw it, so it was like, ‘Oh okay, the film’s finished…’"

Rogue One Director Gareth Edwards Reveals His Biggest Regret

"I thought, one day, either at the premiere, or one of these conventions, I’d get a chance to talk to her. And it’s really sad that it’s not going to get to happen."

Zam Wesell – Who in the Galaxy is That? – by Pariah Burke

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Bounty hunter. Shapeshifter. Partner to Jango Fett. Friend to Boba Fett. Padme’s would-be assassin.

There’s an entire galaxy of characters and adventures beyond Luke, Leia, Han, Rey, Finn, Darth Vader, Boba Fett, and the other faces that dominate the Star Wars films. Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles individual characters from the Star Wars universe—from the films, book, comics, and games. From favorite supporting characters to interesting creatures lurking in the background, if you’ve ever asked “hey, who’s that?” Who in the Galaxy is That? strives to tell you.

Zam Wesell

Zam Wesell in her usual human disguise. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

One of the highlights of Episode II: Attack of the ClonesCanon is the multiple assassination attempts of Senator Padme Amidala on Coruscant, and the subsequent reveal of the would-be killer. The reveal of Zam Wesell rectifies the glaring absence of bounty hunters from the Prequels to that point. It also sets the stage to reveal the high-profile supporting role Jango Fett would come to play throughout the remainder of Episode II—from the moment he silences Wesell to his dramatic demise in the arena during the Battle of Geonosis.

Zam Wesell dies in her natural Clawdite form in Episode II: Attack of the Clones. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

The unaligned bad guys of Star Wars, ubiquitous throughout all Star Wars media since their unexpected popularity from barely 60 seconds of screen time in Episode V: The Empire Strikes BackCanon, bounty hunters are an integral, evil type central to Star Wars. Wesell’s brief but spectacular appearance, a high-speed chase across cluttered Coruscant skies leading to a grounded evasion and foiled strike against Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi and his Padawan Anakin Skywalker, bely Wessel’s nature and experience.

Zam Wesell. Courtesy of Dark Horse Entertainment.

As a Clawdite, Wesell possesses the ability to shapeshift into the form of any humanoid sentient. It’s a trick she employs many times throughout a long career of bounty hunting, even occasionally posing as the sentients she kills. It’s a career that often sees her partnering with Jango Fett—some in canon, some in the alternate reality of the Expanded Universe cum Legends.

Zam Wesell receives orders from Jango Fett. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

Between the Dark Horse Comics graphic novels Star Wars: Jango FettLegends (Non-Canon) and Star Wars: Zam WesellLegends (Non-Canon), and the young reader novels Jango Fett: Bounty HunterCanon, Boba Fett: The Fight to SurviveCanon, and The Life and Legend of Obi-Wan KenobiCanon a long association between the two bounty hunters is described.

Zam Wesell and Jango Fett. Courtesy of Dark Horse Entertainment.

The two first meet during a mutual hunt for smuggler Bendix Fust. Working independently, the two foil each other’s plans; Wesell even attempts to steal Fett’s ship. During their dispute, their fired upon a Firespray-class ship, which destroys Fett’s ship. They subsequently steal the Firespray-class ship, which Fett keeps and later rechristens to his iconic Slave I. The two hunters split the bounty on Fust and immediately partner on another job, sparking a friendship and working relationship that would see them through a dozen other jobs on as many worlds. Wesell even befriends Fett’s clone/son, Boba Fett, on Kamino.

Zam Wesell in her natural Clawdite form. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

Wesell rarely works without Fett—or does so beyond the view of a novel, comic book, or game chronicler—making her death at his hands in Attack of the Clones both startling and poignant.

The cover of Star Wars: Bounty Hunter. Courtesy of LucasArts/Disney.

Zam Wesell stars with Jango Fett in the video game Star Wars: Bounty HunterCanon, which describes in-canon missions accomplished by the pair in the days between Episode I: The Phantom MenaceCanon and their simultaneous screen debuts in Attack of the Clones. Wesell is also a playable character in LEGO Star Wars: The Complete SagaLegends (Non-Canon).

Zam Wesell publicity photo. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

What in the Galaxy are those Symbols?

Throughout Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles you may encounter one or more of the following symbols.

Here’s what they mean:

Canon
Sources and media cited as canon contain information that is officially part of the Star Wars film universe, which also includes non-film media such as books, comic books, games, and more. This means the information is officially part of the history of Star Wars that appears in the films. It came from, or may appear within or influence, the events of a Star Wars film.
Legends
Following Return of the Jedi, George Lucas stated that he would not make other Star Wars movies. He then opened Star Wars to other creators and media. Carefully overseen by Lucas’s company, Lucas Arts, hundreds of new Star Wars novels, comic books and graphic novels, video games, and television shows were created to expand the Star Wars universe and tell stories in all directions—from thousands of years before Luke Skywalker was born to thousands of years after, from filling in the histories of the greatest Star Wars legends to bringing life to every background alien in the Cantina scene. This was the Star Wars Expanded Universe, and it was all canon until new Star Wars films were once again possible. Disney and Lucas Arts then found themselves penned in by the massive amount of material from other creators and projects. They simply couldn’t make Episode VII and beyond because every moment in the lives of the major characters of Han, Luke, Leia, and others had already been chronicled in the Expanded Universe, and very little of that could easily be translated to feature films easily followed by, and appealing to, the many different types of Star Wars fans who loved the Original Trilogy. As a result, a large portion of the formerly-canon Expanded Universe stories were declared non-canon, unofficial in terms of the film continuity. The stories still exist and continue to expand, but now in an alternate reality called Star Wars Legends while other new stories are created alongside them within the universe of the films.
Fandom-Created
Though rare, you’ll see this symbol appear from time-to-time in Who in the Galaxy is That? Star Wars fans are many and varied, and they like to create their own movies, stories, comics, artwork, and more based in the Star Wars universe. Occasionally, a fan-created work is so good and becomes so popular that it gains super star status all on its own. When such rarities relate to the characters profiled in Who in the Galaxy is That?, they are identified by the Fandom-Created symbol.

Suggest a Character to Profile

Have you ever wondered, “who in the galaxy is that?” Tell us in the comments who you’ve wondered about in the Star Wars universe of films, books, comics, games, and even toys. If you know the character’s name, tell us, but if you don’t know a name, tell us where we can find the character that has piqued your curiosity. Something like “the third bounty hunter from the left in the Star Destroyer scene in Empire Strikes Back” works quite well in directing us to who you’re thinking about. Whomever you wonder about, we might just profile in Who in the Galaxy is That?

Kyle Katarn – Who in the Galaxy is That? – by Pariah Burke

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The Chuck Norris of Star Wars. He stole the Death Star plans before Jyn Erso. He stopped the Dark Trooper Project. Stormtrooper. Mercenary. Jedi. Master.

There’s an entire galaxy of characters and adventures beyond Luke, Leia, Han, Rey, Finn, Darth Vader, Boba Fett, and the other faces that dominate the Star Wars films. Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles individual characters from the Star Wars universe—from the films, book, comics, and games. From favorite supporting characters to interesting creatures lurking in the background, if you’ve ever asked “hey, who’s that?” Who in the Galaxy is That? strives to tell you.

Kyle Katarn

Kyle Katarn is the Chuck Norris of Star Wars. Courtesy of Decipher.

While Luke Skywalker is the poster boy for both the Rebel Alliance and the Jedi, Kyle Katarn operates behind the scenes, facing down just as many threats on a parallel journey of self-exploration in the Force along the path to becoming a Jedi Knight. The similarities between Katarn and Skywalker reach back to childhoods farming, a lifestyle despoiled for both by the murder of their parents, incidents that propell both men off their farms and into space to take up arms in the Galactic Civil War. While Skywalker has the guidance of Obi-Wan Kenobi to point him toward the unmuddied evidence of the Empire murdering his surrogate parents, Uncle Owen and Aunt Beru Lars, Katarn initially blames the Rebel Alliance for the slaughter of his family.

Born on a moon of the Rim world Sullust, Katarn seeks an education in one of the few opportunities available to him—the Imperial Academy on Carida.

Kyle Katarn discovers his Jedi nature. Courtesy of LucasArts/Disney.

For his Omega Exercise, a practical, real-fire mission final exam designed to measure a cadet’s leadership potential and effectiveness under pressure, Katarn is place in charge of a strike team raiding a Rebel encampment on a nearby asteroid. During the hazardous mission, Katarn experiences premonitions that hint at heretofore unknown Force sensitivity. His intuitions save the lives of the men under his command. They also inspire him to spare the life of smuggler and Rebel agent Jan Ors, as well as the lives of others on the base.

Katarn’s success at routing the Rebels with minimal losses from his platoon earn him not only graduation from the Imperial Academy as a Stormtrooper, but also immediate decoration and promotion to officer. His joy instantly sours, however, at the simultaneous news of his father’s murder on their family farm on the agricultural moon Sulon. The Rebel Alliance raided Sulon, killing the senior Katarn in the process. Kyle’s mother died some time before, a victim of faulty farming equipment. The loss of his father to the Rebellion leaves Katarn without family; the Empire is there as substitute family. Katarn need only hate the Rebel Alliance, which he now does.

Kyle Katarn meets Mon Mothma. Courtesy of LucasArts/Disney.

While on a pleasure crusie to clear his mind of grief before his first assignment under Imperial commission, Katarn encounaters Jan Ors a second time. She shows him smuggled holorecordings of the attack on Sulon revealing that the true aggressors—and murders of his father—were Imperial troops flying ships painted with Rebel Alliance insignia. Despite the troops disguises, there tactics are blatantly obvious to the new Imperial Academy graduate.

Katarn defects to the Alliance, becoming a spy at the direct behest of Mon Mothma. His first mission in this role is the first-person shooter video game, Star Wars: Dark ForcesLegends (Non-Canon), which, like all of Katarn’s adventures, playable and prose, were official Star Wars canon until being declared unofficial to make way for new film storytelling. Indeed, Katarn’s role in Star Wars canon is undoubtedly a leading reason for the reclassification of the Star Wars Expanded Universe as non-canon. Katarn, you see, was the one who stole the plans to the Death Star.

That first mission Katarn undertakes on behalf of the Rebellion is to the planet Danuta. Success results in his possession of the Death Star plans, which are delivered, indirectly, to Princess Leia. Kyle Katarn is therefore erased by, and to make room for, the events of Rogue One: A Star Wars StoryCanon, which sees Jyn Erso steal the plans to the Death Star.

Agent of the Empire Kyle Katarn becomes an agent of the Rebellion. Courtesy of LucasArts/Disney.

Katarn’s playable adventures continue through four more games with stories that were also canon and often mentioned in more mainstream Star Wars media such as comics and novels. His thwarting of the Empire’s own super-soldier bid, the Dark Trooper project, as well as his encounters with previously hidden Dark Jedi, became the stuff of legend in the Star Wars universe. Throughout all of it he maintains a partnership with Jan Ors.

Following Dark Forces, in the sequel, Star Wars: Jedi Knight: Dark Forces IILegends (Non-Canon), and three Star Wars: Jedi Knight games after that, Katarn begins taking note of a growing sensitivity to, and ability within, the Force. This sets him on the aforementioned odyssey that would see him become a Jedi Knight, one that often mirrors Luke Skywalker’s journey, though Katarn comes closer, and more often, to a fall to the Dark Side than Skywalker’s brief but traumatic visit to the Cave of Evil on Dagobah.

Fans looking to follow the adventures of this exciting and complex character without playing the video games can listen to a fully dramatized radio play of his adventures in Star Wars: Dark ForcesLegends (Non-Canon).

Kyle Katarn, Jedi Knight. Courtesy of LucasArts/Disney.

Eventually, Katarn joins Skywalker’s new Jedi Academy, becoming at various times student and teacher, including as both to Mara Jade. Katarn earns the rank of Jedi Master and is appointed to the Masters’ Council in time to take an active role defending the galaxy from the extra-galactic invaders, the Yuuzhan Vong, as chronicled in the New Jedi Order series of novels, novellas, and short stories.

Katarn is originally portrayed as a non-Force-sensitive mercenary soldier. He is proficient in the use of a wide variety of weapons ranging from vibroblades to most modern blasters. He is also a skilled fighter with significant martial arts prowess. It’s these abilities that inspire a persistent comparison of Katarn as the “Chuck Norris of Star Wars.”

Later, exploring his Jedi nature, he constructs and uses a lightsaber in addition to, and often in place of, a blaster sidearm. He flies a CEC HWK-290 dubbed the Moldy Crow.

Kyle Katarn duels the Dark Jedi Jerec. Courtesy of LucasArts/Disney.

What in the Galaxy are those Symbols?

Throughout Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles you may encounter one or more of the following symbols.

Here’s what they mean:

Canon
Sources and media cited as canon contain information that is officially part of the Star Wars film universe, which also includes non-film media such as books, comic books, games, and more. This means the information is officially part of the history of Star Wars that appears in the films. It came from, or may appear within or influence, the events of a Star Wars film.
Legends
Following Return of the Jedi, George Lucas stated that he would not make other Star Wars movies. He then opened Star Wars to other creators and media. Carefully overseen by Lucas’s company, Lucas Arts, hundreds of new Star Wars novels, comic books and graphic novels, video games, and television shows were created to expand the Star Wars universe and tell stories in all directions—from thousands of years before Luke Skywalker was born to thousands of years after, from filling in the histories of the greatest Star Wars legends to bringing life to every background alien in the Cantina scene. This was the Star Wars Expanded Universe, and it was all canon until new Star Wars films were once again possible. Disney and Lucas Arts then found themselves penned in by the massive amount of material from other creators and projects. They simply couldn’t make Episode VII and beyond because every moment in the lives of the major characters of Han, Luke, Leia, and others had already been chronicled in the Expanded Universe, and very little of that could easily be translated to feature films easily followed by, and appealing to, the many different types of Star Wars fans who loved the Original Trilogy. As a result, a large portion of the formerly-canon Expanded Universe stories were declared non-canon, unofficial in terms of the film continuity. The stories still exist and continue to expand, but now in an alternate reality called Star Wars Legends while other new stories are created alongside them within the universe of the films.
Fandom-Created
Though rare, you’ll see this symbol appear from time-to-time in Who in the Galaxy is That? Star Wars fans are many and varied, and they like to create their own movies, stories, comics, artwork, and more based in the Star Wars universe. Occasionally, a fan-created work is so good and becomes so popular that it gains super star status all on its own. When such rarities relate to the characters profiled in Who in the Galaxy is That?, they are identified by the Fandom-Created symbol.

Suggest a Character to Profile

Have you ever wondered, “who in the galaxy is that?” Tell us in the comments who you’ve wondered about in the Star Wars universe of films, books, comics, games, and even toys. If you know the character’s name, tell us, but if you don’t know a name, tell us where we can find the character that has piqued your curiosity. Something like “the third bounty hunter from the left in the Star Destroyer scene in Empire Strikes Back” works quite well in directing us to who you’re thinking about. Whomever you wonder about, we might just profile in Who in the Galaxy is That?