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Untold Star Wars by Graham Hancock : The Wampa Ice Creature

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Untold Star Wars : The Wampa Ice Creature

There is a tradition in Star Wars movies of cutting between multiple action scenes, particularly in the climax of each film – it’s something that George Lucas always seems to take a great deal of joy in doing. A New Hope may have focused on the singular task of the Rebel Alliance attacking the Death Star, but Return of the Jedi, The Phantom Menace and Revenge of the Sith all cut between various battles taking place in different locations. The Empire Strikes Back of course goes between Leia’s escape from Cloud City and Luke’s duel with Darth Vader in its final act, but opens the film in similar fashion too.

The Battle of Hoth sees the Rebel Snowspeeders facing off against the AT-AT Walkers of the Empire, while cutting back to Echo Base where Han is trying to persuade Leia to leave before they do indeed make a dramatic escape. But even the more sedate opening to the movie, that establishes Echo Base and the Alliance on Hoth, was intended to have more going on than ended up in the finished film.

The Wampa puppet was the solution when the costumes were not suitable.

A small but fun subplot was intended to feature the Wampa ice creature more heavily than it was in the finished film. In The Empire Strikes Back, a Wampa kills Luke’s Tauntaun and drags Luke back to its lair. Because the costumes used for the creatures at the time were not considered convincing enough for audiences, the only shots of the Wampa were a flash of its face – thanks to a hand puppet – and a few snippets showing its arm.

This made for a very spooky, tense scene in the creature’s cave, during which Luke is hanging upside down with his lightsaber out of reach. It’s a great example of Star Wars sound design and score, as both create a sense of impending danger as the audience wills Luke to use the Force to retrieve his lightsaber. When the Jedi-in-training removes one of the beast’s arms, the size of it demonstrates just how dangerous the threat was without the creature ever bring clearly seen.

When George Lucas revisited The Empire Strikes Back for the 1997 Special Edition, he acknowledged in an interview for the home video release that, ‘some people will say that’s more artistic than actually showing it.’ He is not a man to go with what ‘some people’ would want, however, and elected to add the Wampa to the scene in which Luke is captured. The costume developed for the Special Edition is entirely convincing and makes for a suitably menacing ice monster.

The Wampa was given more to do in The Empire Strikes Back Special Edition.

The reason for the Wampa being excised for the original 1980 release of The Empire Strikes Back was that the costume was not remotely satisfactory, which the deleted scenes released as part of the Star Wars: The Complete Saga Blu-ray boxset clearly demonstrate. It is perhaps also surprising that in the opening of the movie Lucas and Director Irvin Kershner would complicate matters with such a subplot.

It may make more sense when bearing in mind that this is a Star Wars movie, and exposition rarely gets too much screen time before something is going wrong for the protagonists. The first snippet that was cut in this sequence sees a mysterious paw clawing at the wall of Echo Base as Han and Leia obliviously argue further down the corridor.

Things escalate in the next moment, when an entire wall of the base caves in next to R2-D2, causing the astromech to scarper quickly before there’s a clearer look at the original, decidedly ropey Wampa costume. A few Rebel Soldiers attempt to take on the yeti-like beast, but are thrown across the room in a classic Star Wars visual gag.

Kenner still made a full Wampa action figure, despite the creature largely being cut. This image shows the Gentle Giant upscaled replica.

A rather ominous little scene sees a group of cautious Rebels inspecting a trashed room in Echo Base, where several Tauntauns lie slaughtered on the floor. It establishes the level of the threat, to the point that even the saga’s most heroic droid reacts by running away from the carnage. R2-D2 is then pursued by one of the Wampas in part of another scene.

The best known of these deleted scenes – or snippets may be a better word – is when C-3PO, running behind Han and Leia to escape the pursing Imperial Snowtroopers, passes a door with a yellow hazardous label on. The protocol droid removes the label, so that when the troops behind them arrive at the door they are unaware of the danger. Sure enough, when a Snowtrooper opens the door, his squad mate is grabbed by a snowy claw and disappears through the doorway.

In an extended version of the scene in which Leia plants the kiss on Luke in order to irritate Han, C-3PO refers to the Wampas attacking the base and being ‘trapped, rather cleverly’ – suggesting further scenes were either planned or filmed that showed how the Wampas came to be captured within Echo Base after their incursion.

Portraying an on-screen snow monster.

With the quality of the costumes, it is clear why Kershner opted to cut around the creature during the scene that did make it into the film, when Luke is captured during his patrol. That scene remained in the movie thanks to some clever cutting, but cutting around the Wampas for this entire subplot would have been something of a struggle.

These scenes were presumably intended to add an extra layer of tension to the early part of the film, which is predominantly character based. Thanks to judicious editing and careful pacing, The Empire Strikes Back as a whole, including that opening section, has an almost perfect rhythm and certainly didn’t need the subplot to ramp up the stakes. What fans will find in this particular batch of deleted scenes is another great example of Lucas having fun with the universe, enjoying detours to look at the weird and wonderful world he was developing around the central storyline.

Kit Fisto – Who in the Galaxy is That? – by Pariah Burke

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Famous for his battle smile. Green-skinned and tentacled with a green lightsaber. Jedi Master. Amphibious Nautolan. Hero of Geonisis, Mon Cala, and Ord Cestus.

There’s an entire galaxy of characters and adventures beyond Luke, Leia, Han, Rey, Finn, Darth Vader, Boba Fett, and the other faces that dominate the Star Wars films. Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles individual characters from the Star Wars universe—from the films, book, comics, and games. From favorite supporting characters to interesting creatures lurking in the background, if you’ve ever asked “hey, who’s that?” Who in the Galaxy is That? strives to tell you.

Kit Fisto

The famous Kit Fisto smile debuts during the Battle of Geonisis. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

Fighting in the Battle of Geonosis with a smile on his face, Jedi Master Kit Fisto instantly piques the interest of Star Wars fans. Of the 200 Jedi who traveled to Geonisis in Episode II: Attack of the ClonesCanon to rescue Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker, Fisto leads the charge in the arena. Admist the grim and determined countenances of the Jedi, Fisto’s is the only smile to grace a battlefield littered with fallen droids and the bodies of Geonisians and Jedi.

The Nautolan Jedi Master becomes famous for his easy smile and positive attitude in and out of combat, even inspiring fanfiction in the aptly titled short story “Kit Fisto’s Smile.”Fan-Created

Nahdar Vebb, Kit Fisto, and a Clone Trooper defend Mon Cala. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

Following the Battle of Geonosis, he appears only once more in the films, as part of Mace Windu’s party intent on arresting Chancellor Palpatine in Episode III: Revenge of the SithCanon. When Palpatine reveals himself to be the titular Sith bent on revenge against the Jedi, Fisto’s smile falters. Moments later, despite fighting bravely, he’s dead by the hand of Palpatine, also known as Darth Sidious. On screen, his smile is absent at the time Palpatine strikes him across the torso, killing him, but in the novelization of Revenge of the Sith, Fisto is beheaded while wearing his trademark smile—at least, this is what we’re mean to infer from the fact that Anakin Skywalker comes to find Fisto’s smiling head sitting detached atop Palpatine’s table.

Between his live action debut and demise, Fisto’s smile and green lightsaber feature in short appearances on television, the Web, and in print.

Kit Fisto wielding duel lightsabers in battle with General Grievious. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

Including the official comic book adaptations of Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith, he is a supporting character, or is mentioned, in more than 25 issues of various Star Wars comic book series from Dark Horse Comics. The latest in terms of Star Wars timelines is as a hologram in Star Wars: Darth Vader and the Ghost PrisonLegends (Non-Canon). He was also a common character in Reversal of FortuneLegends (Non-Canon), a Web-based comic strip published from October 2004 through June 2005 on the now defunct Official Star Wars Fan Club site, Hyperspace.

Though never reaching leading man status, Fisto did appear prominently in Star Wars books. He is mentioned in Michael Reaves noir-style detective story, Coruscant Nights I: Jedi TwilightLegends (Non-Canon), as well as Dark Lord: The Rise of Darth VaderLegends (Non-Canon) and the young adult The Last of the Jedi: The Desperate MissionLegends (Non-Canon), all of which reflect on Fisto’s death at the hands of the Chancellor cum Emperor. He even appears in Star Wars: Head-to-HeadLegends (Non-Canon), a whimsical book that pits two characters against each other and describes which would win in a fight. Fisto faces off against Darth Maul.

Kit Fisto leading a Clone Trooper unit charge during the Battle of Geonosis. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

He is much more active in James Luceno’s Revenge of the Sith prequel novel Labyrinth of EvilLegends (Non-Canon), which begins the entanglement of Fisto’s appearances with those of General Grievous, the four-armed cyborg antagonist in Revenge of the Sith.

That association carried through comics and onto television with Fisto fighting Grievous on a number of episodes of both incarnations of the animated television Star Wars: The Clone WarsCanon.

On the show, Fisto fought Grievous to a standstill and even gaining the upperhand while severing one of Grievous’s four hands. Without the timely intervention of Grievous’s IG-100 MagnaGuards, Fisto likely would have arrested or killed the Separatists’ top general.

Other episodes explored Fisto’s amphibious nature as a member of the Nautolan species. On the aquatic planet Mon Cala, home to future Rebel Alliance Admiral , Fisto commanded a squad of clone troopers in the defense of the Mon Calamari against the planet’s other sentient species, the Quarren. During such underwater missions, Fisto’s biology and unique Force-training focus became evident. As a Nautolan, Fisto was raised in and around water, possessing the ability to breath underwater as well as a comfort moving and fighting there. He further enhanced his underwater combat abilities by orienting his personal Force-training to the task, resulting in an ability to swim with great speed commensurate with the increase in running speed many land-loving Jedi teach themselves.

Arresting Chancellor Palpatine. From left to right: Saesee Tin, Agen Kolar, Mace Windu, and Kit Fisto. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

Beyond The Clone Wars, the only other substantive story of Kit Fisto is the tragically no longer canon novel The Cestus DeceptionLegends (Non-Canon) by Steven Barnes. In the book, the Separatists have begun building bio-technical Jedi-killing droids on the planet Ord Cestus. Obi-Wan Kenobi leads a diplomatic mission to negotiate with the Cestian leadership in hopes of ending the production of the droids. Simultaneously, the less politically adept Jedi Master Kit Fisto is sent to work another side of the same problem by instigating and training a rebellion from the citizens of Ord Cestus. The story is a high point for anyone hoping to learn about Fisto. Not only does it contain Fisto getting nearly equal coverage to A-list star Kenobi, it also allows both Jedi Masters to show of skill sets and roles not found in the other appearances. The Cestus Deception, published during the run of The Clone Wars, ties in tightly with the show, including casting show original villain Asajj Ventress as the chief antagonist who fights both Fisto and Kenobi in dynamically-written lightsaber duels.

Behind the scenes, the design of Kit Fisto was originally created to be the representation of the Sith species. When that idea was abandoned, the tentacled, large-eyed countenance was going to be an individual Sith Lord to appear in Attack of the Clones. That Sith Lord would, after many design revisions and a gender swap, become Asajj Ventress. Lucas asked for the Sith alien design to be refined and softened, with the formerly ghost white skin turned green. The result was Kit Fisto.

Kit Fisto. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

In the Sony PSP in Star Wars: Battlefront: Renegade SquadronLegends (Non-Canon), Kit Fisto is a hero who can be played on the planets Ord Mantell and Sullust. He also appears in the PSP and Nintendo DS follow-up game Star Wars: Battlefront: Elite QuadronLegends (Non-Canon), as well as on all platforms in the LEGO Star Wars III: The Clone WarsLegends (Non-Canon), Star Wars: The Clone Wars: Republic HeroesLegends (Non-Canon), and several other video games.

What in the Galaxy are those Symbols?

Throughout Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles you may encounter one or more of the following symbols.

Here’s what they mean:

Canon
Sources and media cited as canon contain information that is officially part of the Star Wars film universe, which also includes non-film media such as books, comic books, games, and more. This means the information is officially part of the history of Star Wars that appears in the films. It came from, or may appear within or influence, the events of a Star Wars film.
Legends
Following Return of the Jedi, George Lucas stated that he would not make other Star Wars movies. He then opened Star Wars to other creators and media. Carefully overseen by Lucas’s company, Lucas Arts, hundreds of new Star Wars novels, comic books and graphic novels, video games, and television shows were created to expand the Star Wars universe and tell stories in all directions—from thousands of years before Luke Skywalker was born to thousands of years after, from filling in the histories of the greatest Star Wars legends to bringing life to every background alien in the Cantina scene. This was the Star Wars Expanded Universe, and it was all canon until new Star Wars films were once again possible. Disney and Lucas Arts then found themselves penned in by the massive amount of material from other creators and projects. They simply couldn’t make Episode VII and beyond because every moment in the lives of the major characters of Han, Luke, Leia, and others had already been chronicled in the Expanded Universe, and very little of that could easily be translated to feature films easily followed by, and appealing to, the many different types of Star Wars fans who loved the Original Trilogy. As a result, a large portion of the formerly-canon Expanded Universe stories were declared non-canon, unofficial in terms of the film continuity. The stories still exist and continue to expand, but now in an alternate reality called Star Wars Legends while other new stories are created alongside them within the universe of the films.
Fandom-Created
Though rare, you’ll see this symbol appear from time-to-time in Who in the Galaxy is That? Star Wars fans are many and varied, and they like to create their own movies, stories, comics, artwork, and more based in the Star Wars universe. Occasionally, a fan-created work is so good and becomes so popular that it gains super star status all on its own. When such rarities relate to the characters profiled in Who in the Galaxy is That?, they are identified by the Fandom-Created symbol.

Suggest a Character to Profile

Have you ever wondered, “who in the galaxy is that?” Tell us in the comments who you’ve wondered about in the Star Wars universe of films, books, comics, games, and even toys. If you know the character’s name, tell us, but if you don’t know a name, tell us where we can find the character that has piqued your curiosity. Something like “the third bounty hunter from the left in the Star Destroyer scene in Empire Strikes Back” works quite well in directing us to who you’re thinking about. Whomever you wonder about, we might just profile in Who in the Galaxy is That?

Greedo – Who in the Galaxy is That? – by Pariah Burke

He is at the center of history’s most controversial Star Wars moment. He was beat up by Anakin Skywalker. He is a legendary failure. He is Greedo the Young.

There’s an entire galaxy of characters and adventures beyond Luke, Leia, Han, Rey, Finn, Darth Vader, Boba Fett, and the other faces that dominate the Star Wars films. Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles individual characters from the Star Wars universe—from the films, book, comics, and games. From favorite supporting characters to interesting creatures lurking in the background, if you’ve ever asked “hey, who’s that?” Who in the Galaxy is That? strives to tell you.

Greedo

From his appearance, blaster in hand, in Episode IV: A New HopeCanon, Greedo the bounty hunter became the Star Wars symbol of feckless overconfidence at a near Shakespearean level. He’s shot dead in the middle of a speech about his superior skill and luck, then is defeated at every other appearance in flashbacks on his life.

Greedo dies by the hand of Han Solo in A New Hope. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

In a deleted scene from Episode I: The Phantom MenaceCanon, a young Greedo is beat up by Anakin Skywalker after accusing the human boy of cheating to achieve his victory at the Boonta Eve Classic Podrace. (Watch the scene on YouTube.) Greedo is defeated before ever taking a swing—at Skywalker or Solo. In the theatrical release of A New Hope, Han Solo shoots Greedo before the hapless bounty hunter can get off a shot. Although Lucas would later change the altercation multiple times in the 1997 Special Edition, 2004 Trilogy DVD box set, and the 2011 The Complete Saga Blu-ray releases of A New Hope, most fans consider the theatrical release definitive, thus proving empirically that Greedo was killed without returning fire. His death is thrice foreshadowed by the one-sided brawl in The Phantom Menace. First, Greedo’s mouth initiates both the quarrel with Skywalker and the one with Solo, while it’s his opponents who end their respective altercations. Next is the fact that Greedo is never shown to strike Anakin; with Anakin atop him, Greedo is punched but merely struggles ineffectually rather than returning with a shot of his own. The final foreshadowing is more obvious and direct. After the fracas with Skywalker is ended, fellow Rodian child, Ward, admonishes young Greedo that he should “be careful who [he messes] with,” that he will “come to regret it.” Thirty years later, in a dirty corner of Chalmun’s Cantina at the Mos Eisley spaceport, Greedo demonstrates a failure to learn the childhood lesson and suffers the final consequence of that deficiency. Those two aren’t the only occasions on which we see Greedo’s overconfidence and ineptitude.

Greedo losing a fight he instigated with Anakin Skywalker in The Phantom Menace. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

During the Clone Wars, as chronicled by the animated television show Star Wars: The Clone WarsCanon, Greedo works as a bounty hunter in the employ of Jabba the Hutt—the same vocation and patron as when we later meet him in A New Hope. In the episode titled “Sphere of Influence,” the Trade Federation engages Greedo and a team of associates to kidnap the daughters of Pantora planetary Chairman Papanoida, the character whom George Lucas himself portrays in a cameo appearance in Episode III: Revenge of the SithCanon. The Trade Federation hopes to use the abduction as leverage sufficient to force Papanoida to commit Pantora to membership in the Confederacy of Independent Systems (CIS). Greedo’s ineptitude causes him to be instantly found out, and his cowardice before Chairman Papanoida and Jabba the Hutt sees him readily admit culpability. He then leads Papanoida to where his associates are holding the kidnapped daughters. The confrontation results in a blaster fight, with Greedo cowering behind an overturned table in the same cantina in which Solo would later kill him. Because of Greedo’s overconfidence and pusillanimity, the Trade Federation’s plan backfires, ultimately strengthening Pantora’s membership in the Republic and removing the trade embargo previously levied against the planet by the Trade Federation.

Greedo fails again during the Clone Wars. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

Behind the scenes, the green-skinned Rodian is just as luckless.
Two actors portray Greedo in A New Hope. Paul Blake is the actor in the costume and simple rubber mask during the majority of the scene in which Greedo confronts Solo, while actress Mara De Aragon dons a more advanced, animatronic-infused mask during the close-up shots. De Aragon’s mask is fitted with wires and articulators to affect the movements of Greedo’s ears, antennae, and mouth. Unfortunately, just before filming begins, the mouth animatronics malfunction irreparably. At the behest of George Lucas, the actress then manipulates Greedo’s elongated mouth by using a wooden clothespin held between her teeth. The final footage of the clothespin-articulated snout remains in all editions of the film. The mask, with its attendant armatures, wires, tape, and padding, leaves little room for De Aragon to breathe, and, during one period of prolonged setup, rehearsal, and shooting, she finds that she can’t, in fact, draw a breath—nor can she remove the mask herself because of the clumsiness of the costume’s gloves. Fortunately, she manages to gesticulate to Lucas, alerting him to her predicament; Lucas removes the mask, and grants De Aragon more frequent breaks from wearing it during filming.

The fateful encounter in the Cantina moments before Greedo’s death. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney.

As cumbersome as the Greedo costume is, it was nearly a very different design. Early sketches for the character first have him as four-armed and then two-armed but hirsute and betailed.

Beyond film and animation, Greedo receives a little more, though no more heroic, attention. He appears, or is mentioned in, several comics and graphic novels from Dark Horse Comics, including Episode I: Qui-Gon JinnLegends (Non-Canon) and Underworld: The Yavin VassilikaLegends (Non-Canon). As a prominent character in the Cantina Scene, Greedo is naturally included among the character vignettes in The Mos Eisley Cantina Pop-Up BookCanon.

The largest non-Canon appearance of Greedo is in the never-was-Canon anthology Tales from the Mos Eisley CantinaLegends (Non-Canon). As the short stories focus on the backgrounds and adventures of a number of patrons present in Chalmun’s Cantina that fateful day when Skywalker met Solo and Solo killed Greedo, Greedo is mentioned or factors into several tales. He stars in “A Hunter’s Fate: Greedo’s Tale,” written by Tom and Marth Veitch.

Tales from the Most Eisley Cantina, featuring “A Hunter’s Fate: Greedo’s Tale.” Courtesy of Bantam.

“A Hunter’s Fate” recounts Greedo’s childhood of isolation, persecution, and running from his clan’s tormentors. He is born on Rodia, to the wealthy bounty hunter, Greedo the Elder, and into the Tetsu Clan. His father’s rival, Navik the Red, murders the Greedo the Elder and subsumes the family wealth. Neela, the mother of Greedo the Young, the star of the story and this article, goes into hiding with her son and two hundred others of her clan. The junior Greedo is raised on the jungle planet U-Tendik, isolated and ignorant of not only the ways of the galaxy but of his family history, until Navik the Red comes calling again. Greedo, now a teenager, flees with the rest of his clan to the lawless “Smuggler’s Moon” Nar Shaddaa.

After learning his way around the underworld of Nar Shaddaa, Greedo and his family relocate again to the not-too-distant Tattooine. Settling into Mos Espa, Greedo becomes a petty criminal and thug, working his way up through low-level enforcing, to eventually hunt bounties for Jabba the Hutt, the crime lord of Tattooine.

“A Hunter’s Fate: Greedo’s Tale” has also been adapted to a visual medium in the form of the Web comic strip of the same title by Pablo Hidalgo. It was published in the members-only area of Hyperspace, the Official Star Wars Fan Club formerly housed at StarWars.com. Hyperspace was closed by LucasArts in 2011, though portions of the webstrip can be found around the Web.

An installment of the Webstrip “A Hunter’s Fate: Greedo’s Tale”. Courtesy of Hyperspace.

If you want to indulge in role-playing a mistakenly self-professed great bounty hunter, or you want to try to redeem the defeasible Rodian, you can play him in the Star Wars: Battlefront video game and the Fantasy Flight tabletop game Star Wars: Imperial Assault. Greedo’s character card and miniature is available for Star Wars: Imperial Assault in the Greedo  Villain Pack, with the paintable miniature depicting him frozen for all eternity in a slow-draw pose symbolic of the true circumstances of his demise.

The Greedo Villain Pack with Greedo miniature (inset). Courtesy of Fantasy Flight Games.

What in the Galaxy are those Symbols?

Throughout Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles you may encounter one or more of the following symbols.

Here’s what they mean:

Canon
Sources and media cited as canon contain information that is officially part of the Star Wars film universe, which also includes non-film media such as books, comic books, games, and more. This means the information is officially part of the history of Star Wars that appears in the films. It came from, or may appear within or influence, the events of a Star Wars film.
Legends
Following Return of the Jedi, George Lucas stated that he would not make other Star Wars movies. He then opened Star Wars to other creators and media. Carefully overseen by Lucas’s company, Lucas Arts, hundreds of new Star Wars novels, comic books and graphic novels, video games, and television shows were created to expand the Star Wars universe and tell stories in all directions—from thousands of years before Luke Skywalker was born to thousands of years after, from filling in the histories of the greatest Star Wars legends to bringing life to every background alien in the Cantina scene. This was the Star Wars Expanded Universe, and it was all canon until new Star Wars films were once again possible. Disney and Lucas Arts then found themselves penned in by the massive amount of material from other creators and projects. They simply couldn’t make Episode VII and beyond because every moment in the lives of the major characters of Han, Luke, Leia, and others had already been chronicled in the Expanded Universe, and very little of that could easily be translated to feature films easily followed by, and appealing to, the many different types of Star Wars fans who loved the Original Trilogy. As a result, a large portion of the formerly-canon Expanded Universe stories were declared non-canon, unofficial in terms of the film continuity. The stories still exist and continue to expand, but now in an alternate reality called Star Wars Legends while other new stories are created alongside them within the universe of the films.
Fandom-Created
Though rare, you’ll see this symbol appear from time-to-time in Who in the Galaxy is That? Star Wars fans are many and varied, and they like to create their own movies, stories, comics, artwork, and more based in the Star Wars universe. Occasionally, a fan-created work is so good and becomes so popular that it gains super star status all on its own. When such rarities relate to the characters profiled in Who in the Galaxy is That?, they are identified by the Fandom-Created symbol.

Suggest a Character to Profile

Have you ever wondered, “who in the galaxy is that?” Tell us in the comments who you’ve wondered about in the Star Wars universe of films, books, comics, games, and even toys. If you know the character’s name, tell us, but if you don’t know a name, tell us where we can find the character that has piqued your curiosity. Something like “the third bounty hunter from the left in the Star Destroyer scene in Empire Strikes Back” works quite well in directing us to who you’re thinking about. Whomever you wonder about, we might just profile in Who in the Galaxy is That?
Hot Collectables

Per Hedman’s – Life According to Darth – Darth on Vacation

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Darth on Vacation

 

Darth back from holiday
Back From Vacation Brings New Energy

 

 

 

 

Darth on a beach
The Light Side Is Dangerous

 

 

Darth Sunbathes
Everyone Needs Vitamin Darth

 

 

When Your Vacation PlansDoesntCoinside With The Death Star Plans
When Your Vacation Plans Doesnt Coinside With The Death Star Plans

 

 

Or A Scar if Vacation As Its Called
Or A Scar if Vacation As Its Called

 

Next Week … Travelling Vader

Untold Star Wars by Graham Hancock : Origins of Rebellion

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Untold Star Wars: Origins of Rebellion

The editing process is a ruthless part of film production – scenes and storylines that seemed vital in the early stages of a project are excised, entire characters can be removed as the story has to be serviced above all else. Although this is not always the case, as often projects require very little footage removed, it certainly was the case for Revenge of the Sith.

As the fertile imagination of George Lucas launched his prequel movies, he began to introduce numerous characters that do not appear in the classic trilogy. Padme, Mace Windu, Count Dooku and Nute Gunray are all important to the prequel trilogy, but do not appear chronologically after Revenge of the Sith.

The challenge that Lucas faced when shaping Revenge of the Sith was the necessity of putting everything in place for the galaxy as it would appear in A New Hope, while servicing these characters to some extent. Count Dooku was easy – dispatched by Anakin Skywalker to make room for his eventual turn to the dark side. Nute Gunray needed to be woven into the plot to explain where the droid army went. Mace Windu simply needed some kind of memorable death scene to justify his introduction in the first place.

Padme gets even more outfits in these deleted scenes.

Padme’s story arc sits a little strangely in Revenge of the Sith. For much of the film, the fiercely capable politician spends her screen time discussing her pregnancy and worrying about Anakin, her secret husband. When she does mention her political views, it is a sudden and jarring moment – ‘Have you ever considered that we may be on the wrong side?’ – the audience has not seen her doubt the Republic until this moment, and it is fleeting.

The reason this scene between Padme and Anakin sits so strangely in the finished film is that it was initially intended to be part of a story arc that would have given Padme – and Bail Organa – much more to do in the movie. One thing that seems strange in Revenge of the Sith is how acquiescent the Senate is during Palpatine’s rise to power. The cut scenes show that actually there would have been a number of senators with concerns and a desire to stop him.

Bail Organa had a larger role in the original cut.

The first from this series, included on the 2005 DVD release, shows Mon Mothma and Bail Organa (portrayed by Genevieve O’Reilly and Jimmy Smits, who recently reprised their roles in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story) explaining their concerns to fellow sympathetic senators including Padme. Bail Organa is visibly frustrated, and the pair have clearly already decided to start putting some kind of framework in place to resist the creeping dictatorship.

Later, a slightly different group are back in Padme’s apartment discussing the ways they can push back against Palpatine’s increasing power. The implication of anything beyond legitimate democratic methods is not present in this scene, with the focus being on a petition that the group has gathered to put pressure on the Chancellor.

The next scene in the sequence sees Padme and fellow senators being pushed back by Chancellor Palpatine, reassuring them that the appointment of governors will not undermine the Senate – a nice line, foreshadowing hardworking governors like Tarkin who would never dream of superseding democracy for the sake of control. The level of power Palpatine holds is demonstrated by his initial attempt to put a reassuring front on, before switching to a blunt, ‘I’ve said I’ll do what is right’ – there is no doubt here that the usual channels of recourse are closed to the group.

Mon Mothma’s speaking role was left on the cutting room floor.

These scenes would have greatly benefited Padme’s character in Revenge of the Sith, showing a logical growth following her story in The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones. In both films, she is shown as a thoughtful diplomat who will also take up arms when the occasion calls for it – in Revenge of the Sith, she is little more than the concerned wife. Of course her role, carrying Anakin’s children, is pivotal as it is his fear of her death in childbirth that propels his descent into darkness. This demonstrates what happened to all extraneous subplots in Revenge of the Sith – they were jettisoned.

With a self-imposed running time around the two hour mark, Lucas realised that this film needed to be pared down to the story that had to be told; Anakin Skywalker’s transformation into Darth Vader. The interesting characters that he had introduced in the previous two films no longer had the luxury of time, they had to serve the story of Revenge of the Sith.

Tonally, the scenes may have jarred slightly if included in the movie – the overwhelming feeling that Revenge of the Sith gives, until the movie’s closing moments, is one of inevitably. No matter what the heroes do, the dark side has already won because Palpatine has so successfully out-manoeuvred the Jedi at every turn. The scenes with Bail and Mon Mothma encouraging a fledgling rebellion may have given the illusion that the protagonists actually had a chance of winning.

Anakin’s fall to the dark side had to take precedence in the finished film.

The benefit of including the scenes, as well as giving Padme the decent final storyline her character deserved, would have been to provide a little more connective tissue with the Classic Trilogy. Palpatine’s reference to governors, the inclusion of Mon Mothma and the tentative steps she and Bail Organa took towards a rebellion would have all been welcome. Additionally, the scenes would have demonstrated that Palpatine did not assume power unopposed and equally how futile that opposition was by this point. Like the Jedi’s realisation of what was going on, it had come too late.

They may not be full of action, unique imagery or moments of fan service, but for anyone who enjoys seeing the kind of female characters Lucas wrote long before social media was claiming it a never-before-seen trend, the scenes showing Padme discussing ways to oppose Palpatine with fellow Senators are well worth watching. Even if they didn’t end up in the finished film, they confirm everything Episodes I and II told the audience about the character of Padme Amidala.

Wedge Antilles – Who in the Galaxy is That? – by Pariah Burke

The template for Poe Dameron. The galaxy’s greatest buddy. The galaxy’s greatest fighter ace. Rogue Leader. Commando. The only Rebel pilot to fly against and survive both Death Stars.

There’s an entire galaxy of characters and adventures beyond Luke, Leia, Han, Rey, Finn, Darth Vader, Boba Fett, and the other faces that dominate the Star Wars films. Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles individual characters from the Star Wars universe—from the films, book, comics, and games. From favorite supporting characters to interesting creatures lurking in the background, if you’ve ever asked “hey, who’s that?” Who in the Galaxy is That? strives to tell you.

Wedge Antilles

Despite a cumulative screen time of less than five minutes across the entire Original Trilogy, wherein he was played by three different actors, Wedge Antilles instantly became a curiosity for Star Wars film fans. Beyond the films, Star Wars creators have elevated him to leading man status with a frequency of appearances just shy of those by the likes of Han Solo and Luke Skywalker.

Wedge Antilles flying an X-Wing against the Death Star in the Battle of Yavin. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney

Flying in Red Squadron against the Death Star, Antilles first proves his mettle on screen in Episode IV: A New Hope.Canon Played by actor Colin Higgens but voiced by David Ankrum, Antilles attends the pre-battle briefing on Yavin 4, and then flies in the battle against the looming threat of the Death Star under the callsign Red Two. Switching actors to Denis Lawson, who played and voiced the character moving forward, Antilles goes on to fly a snowspeeder in the Battle of Hoth in Episode V: The Empire Strikes BackCanon. Aided in the two-seat T-47 Snowspeeder by gunner Wes Janson, with whom Antilles will come to forge a deep friendship and decades-long working relationship, Antilles is the first pilot to down an AT-AT on Hoth. Still played by Lawson, Antilles flies an Incom T-65B X-Wing again against the second Death Star in the Battle of Endor in Episode VI: Return of the JediCanon. Flying against both Death Stars earns him the singular distinction of being the only Rebel pilot to do so and survive.

He might have earned himself a hattrick by flying against Starkiller Base thirty years later if Lawson had been a little more interested.

Behind the scenes, Antilles was slated for an onscreen appearance in Episode VII: The Force AwakensCanon and actor Denis Lawson invited to reprise his role. The actor declined the invitation saying it “would have bored [him],” according to an interview with The Verge (May, 2014).

Wedge Antilles flying against the second Death Star in the Battle of Endor. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney

The former Red Two co-founds Rogue Squadron with Luke Skywalker and becomes callsign Rogue Three to Skywalker’s Rogue Two. When Skywalker resigns his military commission following the Battle of Hoth to focus on his Jedi training, Antilles moves up to Rogue Leader.

The character of Poe Dameron is very much a modern version of Wedge Antilles—at least, of the Antilles from the Expanded Galaxy cum Legacy.

In the formerly-titled Expanded Galaxy, Luke Skywalker’s buddy grows into a fully-realized hero all his own. Freed from the shadow of the legendary Skywalker piloting and battle prowess, Antilles becomes the greatest pilot in the New Republic that rises from the Rebel Alliance. But flying isn’t all he does. Under his leadership, Rogue Squadron not only remains the most elite starfighter squadron in the galaxy, but also engages in espionage and planetside guerrilla operations. These blended mode exploits prove so successful even with a team primarily trained as fighter pilots that Antilles forms a second unit of part time pilots, part time commandos. The beings of Wraith Squadron are soldiers and misfits trained as X-Wing pilots but whose primary skills lie outside the cockpit. Antilles’s friend and former Rogue, Wes Janson, leads the Wraiths in the field.

Wraith Squadron from the X-Wing Series starring Wedge Antilles as Rogue Leader. Courtesy of Bantam

Most of the adventures of Antilles leading Rogue Squadron occur in the X-Wing Series novels by Michael A. Stackpole and Aaron Allston. The fifth book in that series, Wraith SquadronLegends (Non-Canon), details the creation, operations, and ultimately disbanding of the titular commando-pilot unit. Although Wraith Squadron is part of Star Wars Legends and no longer canon, its idea—and the idea that it would be founded by Wedge Antilles—was so good that it was recreated in canon in the form of the similarly named Phantom Squadron, which Antilles founds and leads in the novel Aftermath: Life DebtCanon, set between Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens.

After an adventurous and distinguished military career that ultimately saw him spend a decade as a general in New Republic Fleet Operations, Antilles retires. Barely a year later he rejoins to play a pivotal role in the Yuuhzan Vong War, the centerpiece event of the Expanded Galaxy. From there, Antilles participates in the Second Galactic Civil War, serves as Supreme Commander of the Corellian Defense Force, and assists Luke Skywalker’s New Jedi Order in defeating Darth Caedus before retiring for the final time.

His early years and inspiration to fly for the Rebellion differ between Legends and Canon.

Wedge Antilles, flying a snowspeeder, takes down an Imperial AT-AT walker on Hoth. Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney

In the original Legends history, Antilles is a trader with a small freighter based on a moon orbiting his home planet Corellia. Antilles is honest, often to his own detriment, preferring to struggle financially rather than engage in smuggling. He is also non-political, having little interest in joining either the Empire or the Rebellion. Eventually, he falls in love with a young woman who has profound rebel leanings. When she is killed by indiscriminate action by the Empire, Antilles joins the Rebel Alliance largely because of a sense of obligation to his late girlfriend. Having picked a side, he quickly learns the righteousness of the cause in opposing the repeated atrocities and institutionalized evil of the Empire.

Star Wars: RebelsCanon, the animated television show, tells an alternate, in-canon backstory for Wedge Antilles. In it, Antilles enrolls in the Imperial Skystrike Academy where he immediately distinguishes himself as a skilled pilot despite a growing unease with the systemic amorality evident in the TIE Fighter pilot training program. In the impetus for the most significant motivating incident, he and two other cadets refuse to shoot down an unarmed transport during a flight simulation. When their superior officer chastises them, making it clear that the Empire’s policies mandate such action, the other cadets are galvanized into defection. With fellow cadets Hobbie and Sabine Wren in tow, Antilles abandons Skystrike and defects to the Rebel Alliance.

Wedge Antilles (left) with fellow TIE Fighter pilots-in-training Sabine Wren (center) and Hobbie (right). Courtesy of LucasFilm/Disney

In neither reality is Wedge Antilles of any realation to Raymus Antilles, Captain of the doomed Tantive IV that carries Princess Leia and the Death Star plans away from the Battle of Scarif in Rogue One: A Star Wars StoryCanon only to be overtaken and captured over Tattooine by the Imperial Star Destroyer the Devastator. That Captain Antilles, an Alderaanian, was ultimately strangled during the capture by Darth Vader. Wedge is from Corellia and only coincidentally shares a last name with Raymus.

Wedge Antilles appears, at least in mention if not as a main or large supporting character, in nearly every Star Wars Legends novel set after Return of the Jedi and most from as far back as five years before the Battle of Yavin. Anywhere the forces of the Rebel Alliance fly combat, Antilles is one of the pilots if not the squadron commander. He therefore also factors heavily into playable starfighter combat with appearances in the Star Wars flight simulator games Star Wars: X-Wing, Star Wars: Battlefront, Star Wars: Rogue Squadron, including its sequel, Star Wars: Rogue Squadron II: Rogue Leader in which the player can be either Wedge Antilles or Luke Skywalker, and other video games, as well as table-top games like Star Wars: X-Wing Miniatures and Star Wars Armada.

The Wedge Antilles card from the FStar Wars: X-Wing Miniatures game. Courtesy of Fantasy Flight Games

What in the Galaxy are those Symbols?

Throughout Who in the Galaxy is That? profiles you may encounter one or more of the following symbols.

Here’s what they mean:

Canon
Sources and media cited as canon contain information that is officially part of the Star Wars film universe, which also includes non-film media such as books, comic books, games, and more. This means the information is officially part of the history of Star Wars that appears in the films. It came from, or may appear within or influence, the events of a Star Wars film.
Legends
Following Return of the Jedi, George Lucas stated that he would not make other Star Wars movies. He then opened Star Wars to other creators and media. Carefully overseen by Lucas’s company, Lucas Arts, hundreds of new Star Wars novels, comic books and graphic novels, video games, and television shows were created to expand the Star Wars universe and tell stories in all directions—from thousands of years before Luke Skywalker was born to thousands of years after, from filling in the histories of the greatest Star Wars legends to bringing life to every background alien in the Cantina scene. This was the Star Wars Expanded Universe, and it was all canon until new Star Wars films were once again possible. Disney and Lucas Arts then found themselves penned in by the massive amount of material from other creators and projects. They simply couldn’t make Episode VII and beyond because every moment in the lives of the major characters of Han, Luke, Leia, and others had already been chronicled in the Expanded Universe, and very little of that could easily be translated to feature films easily followed by, and appealing to, the many different types of Star Wars fans who loved the Original Trilogy. As a result, a large portion of the formerly-canon Expanded Universe stories were declared non-canon, unofficial in terms of the film continuity. The stories still exist and continue to expand, but now in an alternate reality called Star Wars Legends while other new stories are created alongside them within the universe of the films.
Fandom-Created
Though rare, you’ll see this symbol appear from time-to-time in Who in the Galaxy is That? Star Wars fans are many and varied, and they like to create their own movies, stories, comics, artwork, and more based in the Star Wars universe. Occasionally, a fan-created work is so good and becomes so popular that it gains super star status all on its own. When such rarities relate to the characters profiled in Who in the Galaxy is That?, they are identified by the Fandom-Created symbol.

Suggest a Character to Profile

Have you ever wondered, “who in the galaxy is that?” Tell us in the comments who you’ve wondered about in the Star Wars universe of films, books, comics, games, and even toys. If you know the character’s name, tell us, but if you don’t know a name, tell us where we can find the character that has piqued your curiosity. Something like “the third bounty hunter from the left in the Star Destroyer scene in Empire Strikes Back” works quite well in directing us to who you’re thinking about. Whomever you wonder about, we might just profile in Who in the Galaxy is That?

The UK fan Experience by Mark Newbold – UK Stars On The Small Screen

UK Fan Experience: UK Stars on The Small Screen

While the Star Wars galaxy was being writ large on the silver screen, breaking records wherever it went and changing the face of 20th century cinema, the British stars of the film continued to beaver away on the small screen. During the 70’s and 80’s many of the largely unknown stars of the trilogy could be seen on UK television, dusting a sprinkle of GFFA magic wherever they went.

Alex Guiness looking pensive-River-Kwai-1957
Alex Guiness-River-Kwai-1957

 

Some of those stars were already hugely popular and well known to audiences across the country. While Sir Alec Guinness was best known for his movie performances, winning the Oscar for 1957’s Bridge On The River Kwai, the small screen was home to a number of successes. The role of George Smiley in 1979’s Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy – which also featured future Captain Picard Patrick Stewart – was a huge success and was followed by Smiley’s People in 1982 which saw a returning Stewart and future Professor Snape Alan Rickman. Guinness rightly won the BAFTA for best actor for both performances.

 

Peter Cushing had famously appeared on the big screen as Doctor Who and the small screen in the role of Sherlock Holmes, but were you aware that he had also appeared sporadically on the Morcambe and Wise Show in an ongoing skit involving unpaid appearance fees? With that legendary show regularly hitting north of 20 million viewers, Cushing’s comic touch was widely on show.

Peter Cushing as Dr Who
Peter Cushing as Dr Who

Dave Prowse was known to British audiences of the 70’s for his bodybuilding endeavours and for a time was seen often and everywhere. Viewers could catch him on the most adult Saturday morning kids TV show ever, Tiswas while evening watchers could see him pop up in such shows as the aforementioned Morcambe and Wise, The Benny Hill Show and hard-edged cop show Callan while kids would see him in The Tomorrow People. And like a plethora of UK actors he made an appearance in Doctor Who. Prowse played The Minotaur in the John Pertwee era episode The Time Monster. (Note from the jEditor and the Green X code man).

Green X Code
Green X Code

Denis Lawson, who ably portrayed heroic X-wing pilot Wedge Antilles across the original trilogy, also made inroads on the small screen. A high-profile part in Local Hero saw him switch screens and film two series in 1984 and 1986 as devious radio DJ Kit Curran in The Kit Curran Radio Show which co-starred future The Phantom Menace star Lindsay Duncan, who was the voice of TC-14. Series one aired on ITV while series two switched to Channel Four.

Dennis Lawson as Kit Curran
Dennis Lawson as Kit Curran

 

Lindsay Duncan
Lindsay Duncan

Don Henderson, best known to GFFA fans as General Tagge appeared in four popular TV series. He first played the character of Detective George Bulman in 1976’s The XYY man, returning for 1982’s Strangers and again 5 years later in sequel series Bulman. 1989 saw him star alongside Leslie Grantham in The Paradise Club, which also featured Return of the Jedi Rebel Commando John Altman – better known as Nasty Nick from Eastenders – in the episode Rock and Roll Roulette which starred Iron Maiden’s Bruce Dickinson.

Henderson also appeared in 9 episodes of Doctor Who in 1987 and in sci-fi comedy Red Dwarf in what would be his final onscreen role in 1997.

Even the Emperor himself saw action on the gogglebox as Ian McDiarmid appeared in a 1979 episode of The Professionals, the 1977 – 1983 series centered around the missions of the fictional CI-5 division. McDiarmid appeared as the eponymous Mickey Hamilton in the 24th November 1979 episode The Madness of Mickey Hamilton. McDiarmid wasn’t alone. Bruce Boa, better known as the Waldorf Salad eating American visitor in Fawlty Towers and General Riekan from The Empire Strikes Back also appeared in a 1978 episode, as did Boba Fett himself Jeremy Bulloch in the following episode. Indeed, it was a regular haunt for Star Wars actors. The future Admiral Ozzel Michael Sheard, Wes Janson actor Ian Liston. Imperial Officer Bewill Milton Johns and the ill-fated Captain Needa, actor Michael Culver all made appearances.

Daisey Ridley in Silent Witness
Daisy Ridley in Silent Witness

 

Step forward a few decades and that streak continues. Daisy Ridley appeared in episodes of Silent Witness and Mister Selfridge while John Boyega turned up in the original BBC version of Being Human and Law and Order: UK. Felicity Jones first arrived on screens in The Worst Witch in 1996 and by 2008 was in Doctor Who in the episode The Unicorn and the Wasp while Riz Ahmed starred in the 2008 three-part drama Wired.
With new Star Wars films coming thick and fast, the roster of Star Wars actors appearing on UK screens is only going to escalate.

Worst Witch BBC
Worst Witch BBC

Per Hedman’s – Life According to Darth – Darth and Sports

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Darth and Sports

 

Darth and a cup of coffee
That Is Not A Sport

 

 

Darth running
You Need To Practice

 

 

Darth commits a foul
Harsh Judge

 

 

Force a deflection
Its Hard Scoring On Darth

 

Not winning
My Team Never Wins

Next Week … Darth on Vacation

Episode VIII -Title Announced- The Last Jedi

THE LAST JEDI

Eight’s title is The Last Jedi. Let’s break it down.

Episode VIII The Last Jedi
Episode VIII

“The.” I was hoping there would be a little more variation; there are two movies in a row that begin with the definite article. Not that I’m truly disappointed. If the worst thing about a movie is its title then that’s a good thing, and there’s always Episode 9 for something more like Hidden Fortress.

“Last.” I’m sure you remember that The Force Awakens literally spelled out in its opening crawl that Luke is the last Jedi. But that was then. Rey found him and she might be trained; and at least one former student of Luke’s is still alive and might have a chance.

“Jedi.” In English this can be singular or plural. It can remain just Luke as in TFA; it can be both Luke and Rey (and/or maybe others). Or it can solely be Rey. Which leads me to this fake leaked crawl.

Assuming this isn’t a working title, I thought it might be helpful to wait and see what the title is in non-English-speaking countries in which the languages specify singular/plural (and gender) for Jedi, but that might not help either. For example, Return of the Jedi seems to refer to Luke specifically, but can also mean that he will begin a new Order of (plural) Jedi. However, a glance at IMDB shows that other countries stuck with the singular Jedi, e.g. the French Le retour du Jedi. But hey — someone please let me know if some title out there turns out to use the feminine and plural!

Even if Luke is not (or at some point ceases to be) the title character, he might remain alive. Or once a Jedi, always a Jedi? Who decides? If Luke believes himself and his attempt at restarting the Order to be failures, he may renounce the title of Jedi and have someone else be the last even while Luke is still living. Or perhaps Luke will for whatever reason decide the Jedi ways, whether Prequel-era or earlier, are too flawed and should not continue. He may make the choice to be the last Jedi while Rey begins a new and better tradition, or they may restart some ancient proto-Jedi tradition that Luke discovered in the temple ruins. Of course let’s not forget Rey’s agency either: she might be the one to decide not to become a Jedi, whether or not Luke agrees, and there may be no one left to take that title. (Of course it occurred to me that Rey could also die, but that would defeat the purpose of giving her a large role to help the audience move on from the old characters/actors and connect with the new ones.)

The ancient ruins on Ahcht-To give me another idea. The Legends, as always, are full of ideas for the new canon to mine. In Knights of the Old Republic II: Sith Lords, for example, the Jedi were nearly wiped out over four thousand years before A New Hope and there remained only one, a few, or zero Jedi still living in the end of the game depending on the player’s choices. The idea that the Jedi face extinction in a repeating cycle since ancient times can easily become part of the new canon as well, and in this case The Last Jedi may refer to a historical Jedi who had the responsibility of restarting the order just as Luke did, explaining why Luke sought answers on Ahcht-To. The possibilities are endless.

Or maybe the episode titles for the sequels are each part of a sentence, and Episode 9 will be To Get a Real Job.

This is why you shouldn’t want to hear me speculate.

Star Wars: Episode VIII: The Last Jedi will be in theaters December 14 or 15, 2017, depending on your location.

–Victory-class Woman

Nothing to do with Star Wars Except 1977 and Strong Women

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Wonder Woman ’77 meets The Bionic Woman #2

 

Previews of the Dynamite titles in stores on 01/25/2017.

Wonder and Bionic Cover
Cover

 

Star Wars – it is not, but anybody who watched Star Wars the first time round will be familiar with these two. Perhaps the only female icons on TV at that time Jamie Sommers and Diana Prince are etched into my memory. They pre-date Leia but neither of them needed rescuing and both ‘gave as good as they got’. They set the scene for the Fiesty Princess. Prncess Leia was surely a product of these times and this culture. I will be buying a copy on Thursday.

Wonder and Bionic Alternate Cover
Alternate Cover

Wonder Woman ’77 / Bionic Woman #2

writer: Andy Mangels

artist: Judit Tondora

covers: Cat Staggs (a), Aaron Lopresti (b),

incentive cover: Cat Staggs (“virgin art”), Aaron 

Lopresti (B/W art)

Fans & retailers, order the cover of your choice!

FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+ 

Party like it’s 1977 in this cross-over event fans have wanted for decades — but never thought possible! Now, Diana Prince meets Jaime Sommers… or should we say, Wonder Woman meets The Bionic Woman? In this action-packed mini-series, the two television titans team up to fight a rogue cabal bent on wreaking havoc and stealing deadly weapons. Can CASTRA be stopped before their real targets are revealed and lives are lost? With super powers, bionic enhancements, surprise villains, and an invisible plane, just about anything is possible!

 

 

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All images courtesy of Dynamite Comics